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FROM THE OFFICE OF

Dr. Mary Ticknor

From July 18-20, hundreds of people attended Little Mountain Community Theatre’s debut production, “The Wizard of Oz.” The show was very entertaining and brought together people – including the actors, musicians, crew, and the audience itself – from a variety of surrounding communities to Lemont High School’s Performing Arts Center. This 850+ seat venue truly belongs to the community. Since opening in Spring 2008, it has played host to a range of events, ranging from concerts to park district events to Lemont High School theater and music productions. Read More
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Class Overview
3D Design & Animation
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3D Design & Animation

Grades Course Open To: 10-11-12

Credit: 0.5

Prerequisite: None

This introductory course helps prepare students for college or technical college in the burgeoning field of design and drafting, specializing in three-dimensional design and animation. A growing field within the motion picture and video industries, there is an increasing demand for individuals in the field of 3D design and animation. The course covers the development of two- and three-dimensional objects to produce rendered still frames (scenes) and, using these objects, produce rendered animations. Some of the areas of study include three-dimensional modeling, rendering, animation, lighting and material considerations, and scene composition. Technology is used in the development of projects in this course.

Advanced 3D Design & Animation

Advanced 3D Design & Animation

Grades Course Open To: 10-11-12

Credit: 0.5

Prerequisite: Successful completion of 3D Design & Animation or consent of Division Chair

This course is intended for advanced-level 3D design and animation students. Students learn advanced modeling techniques, advanced lighting and rendering techniques, character animation and special effects. Students are prepared to pursue further study in the field at a post-secondary institution or technical college.

Biology Honors

Biology Honors

Grades Course Open To: 9

Credit: 1.0 - Honors credit

Prerequisite: Placement based on student’s placement exam results

This course is very rigorous in nature and includes some topics covered in a college curriculum. An activity-based teacher-, student- and group-led course, it stresses the connections between the field of biology and the real world by incorporating not only the science of biology, but also its implications on today’s society. Students gain a working knowledge of the principles of scientific research and the application of simple research projects, and also demonstrate the ability to recognize plants and animals and their interrelationship. Areas of study include the nature of science, cellular biology, heredity and genetics, biotechnology, biochemistry, classification, evolution and careers in the biological field.

Physics Foundations

Physics Foundations

Grades Course Open To: 10

Credit: 1.0

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Integrated Science and either Pre-Algebra or Algebra I, and result of Physics placement test; or consent of Division Chair

This course introduces students to the physical laws of science, stressing a basic understanding of the concepts of physics. These concepts are presented simply and logically, with ideas developed to a more complex level through laboratory work and activities. The course uses hands-on conceptual experiences, rather than emphasizing the mathematical relationships of physics. Concepts are related to everyday life and their importance to all students. The course presents a practical study of the relationship between matter and energy, with a major emphasis placed on the areas of motion, forces, momentum, gravity, energy, light, sound and electricity. Physics equations are used as a guide to reinforce the concepts of physics, rather than being the main emphasis of the course. Note: This course is not accepted by the NCAA Eligibility Center.

Physics

Physics

Grades Course Open To: 10

Credit: 1.0

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Integrated Science or Biology Honors, grade of C or better in Algebra I or Algebra I AB, and result of Physics placement test; or consent of Division Chair

Covering concepts in more detail than Physics Foundations, the course is taught in a rigorous conceptual format, with students learning about the rules that govern nature. Mathematical equations are applied in a limited format as they relate to the subject matter; students apply these new concepts to solve for new and interesting situations. Critical thinking skills are applied with the concepts of physics to solve problems and successfully complete major projects. Students apply concepts and equations to critical thinking situations based on data, observations or information given. Major areas of study include motion, forces, momentum, gravity, light, sound and electricity.

Advanced Placement Physics I: Algebra-Based

AP Physics I: Algebra-Based

Grades Course Open To: 10

Credit: 1.0 - weighted for AP

Prerequisite: Grade of B or better in Algebra II or Accelerated Algebra II Honors, successful completion of Biology Honors, or consent of Division Chair

Fees: AP Physics I exam (paid at fall registration)

This course emphasizes the mathematical relationships of physics; students enrolled must possess strong mathematical skills. Students are expected to apply concepts and equations to critical thinking situations based on data, observations or information given. Critical thinking skills are applied using the concepts of physics to solve problems and successfully complete major projects. The course covers Newtonian mechanics (including rotational dynamics and angular momentum); work, energy and power; and mechanical waves and sound. Electric circuits also are introduced. This course is very rigorous in nature and emphasizes physics concepts and their relationship to nature, with a heavier emphasis on the use of physics equations. It covers additional material and utilizes more complicated mathematics than the standard Physics course. This course is equivalent to a first-semester college course in algebra-based physics. Students are suggested to enroll in this course concurrently with Chemistry Honors. Note: All students enrolled in this course must take the AP Physics I exam in the spring.

Chemistry Foundations

Chemistry Foundations

Grades Course Open To: 11-12

Credit: 1.0

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Integrated Science, and Physics Foundations or Physics

This is a non-traditional, introductory course intended for students who are either not planning on attending college in the future, or who do not have a strong background in math or science. Students apply basic chemistry concepts to everyday situations and learn the importance of chemistry in their own lives. Laboratory work is integrated into the curriculum on a weekly basis, and focuses on lab techniques, connecting labs to class work and reporting lab results in a standard format. Areas of study include water, conserving chemical resources, petroleum, food, air and climate chemistry, and experimental design. The topics of measurement, balancing equations, writing formulas, basic stoichiometry, history and use of the periodic table, organic and biochemistry, and the gas laws are emphasized. Note: This course is not accepted by the NCAA Eligibility Center.

Chemistry

Chemistry

Grades Course Open To: 11-12

Credit: 1.0

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Accelerated Algebra II Honors, grade of C or better in Algebra II, or grade of A in Algebra II AB; and successful completion of Physics Honors, grade of C or better in Physics, or grade of A in Physics Foundations

Covering concepts in more detail than Chemistry Foundations, this course is designed for college-bound students who are not expecting to major in a science field in college, and integrates basic mathematical and chemical theories that traditional chemistry classes include on a “need-to-know” basis. Students are familiarized with basic chemistry concepts while also understanding why the subject is important in everyday living. Laboratory work is integrated into the curriculum on a weekly basis, and focuses on lab techniques, write-ups and data analysis; formal write-ups are introduced, but most labs are submitted in a standard format. Areas of study include water, conserving chemical resources, petroleum, food, air and climate chemistry, nuclear chemistry, and experimental design. The topics of measurement, balancing equations, writing formulas, basic stoichiometry, history and use of the periodic table, organic and biochemistry, and the gas laws are emphasized.

Chemistry Honors

Chemistry Honors

Grades Course Open To: 10-11

Credit: 1.0 - Honors Credit

Prerequisite: Grade of A in Algebra II or Algebra II AB, grade of C or better in Accelerated Algebra II Honors, or grade of A in Algebra I or Algebra I AB (for sophomores); and grade of A in Physics, grade of C or better in Physics Honors, or grade of A in Integrated Science or grade of C or better in Biology Honors (for sophomores)

This advanced-level course is intended for students who are considering some type of science major in college, and prepares students for further study of chemistry, whether in AP Chemistry or in college courses. It explores basic chemical concepts and theory, and helps students develop extensive problem solving and laboratory analysis skills. Laboratory work is integrated into the curriculum on a weekly basis, and focuses on lab techniques and the presentation and statistical analysis of data; students are expected to analyze their work in formal write-ups. Students are expected to develop a deep understanding of the topics covered, which include atomic theory, electron theory, chemical bonding, formula writing, equation writing and balancing, stoichiometry, states of matter, solution chemistry, and acid base theory, as well as the history and use of the periodic table.

Advanced Placement Biology

Advanced Placement Biology

Grades Course Open To: 11-12

Credit: 1.5 - weighted for AP

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Integrated Science or Biology Honors and Chemistry or Chemistry Honors; or consent of Division Chair

Fees: AP Biology exam (paid at fall registration)

This advanced course is designed to be the equivalent of a college introductory biology course usually taken by biology majors in their freshman year, or of a high-quality college program in introductory biology. The quality of textbook used and the kinds of labs performed are the equivalent of those done by college students. The course provides students with the conceptual framework, factual knowledge and analytical skills necessary to deal critically with the rapidly changing science of biology. Areas of study include molecules and cells, heredity, evolution, organisms and populations; students understand and apply concepts of these units to current topics in the field of study. Students must be self-motivated and have a keen interest in science. They develop analytical thinking, problem solving and critical analysis techniques, all while developing an appreciation for the beauty of nature. Note: All students enrolled in this course must take the AP Biology exam in the spring.

Advanced Placement Chemistry

Advanced Placement Chemistry

Grades Course Open To: 11-12

Credit: 1.0 - weighted for AP

Prerequisite: Grade of B or better in Chemistry or Chemistry Honors, or consent of Division Chair

Fees: AP Chemistry exam (paid at fall registration)

This is an upper-level course designed to prepare students for college-level study in engineering, medicine or other chemistry-based careers. An emphasis is placed on theory, mathematical analysis and problem solving. The class serves as preparation for college-level chemistry classes, and is designed to enable the most aggressive high school students to gain an edge in collegiate study. Some major areas of study include thermochemistry, chemical equilibrium, acid-base theory, redox reactions, kinetics and thermodynamics, and nuclear and organic chemistry. Lab work focuses on technique, lab design and formal write-ups. Students are expected to spend additional time and energy beyond the class period to complete the course material. Note: All students enrolled in this course must take the AP Chemistry exam in the spring.

Advanced Placement Environmental Science

Advanced Placement Environmental Science

Grades Course Open To: 11-12

Credit: 1.0 - weighted for AP

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Biology Honors; or grade of B or better in Integrated Science, and successful completion of Physics Honors or grade of B or better in Physics; or consent of Division Chair

Fees: AP Environmental Science exam (paid at fall registration)

This rigorous college-level course prepares students for collegiate study in environmental sciences, and is strongly recommended for students who plan on pursuing any college major that emphasizes environmental studies such as engineering, chemistry, ecology, forestry, or other environmentally or biologically based careers. The course stresses scientific principles, as well as collection and analysis of data. Environmental issues are evaluated from scientific, sociological and political perspectives. Topics of study include climate change, aquatic, soil, forest and prairie ecosystems, and major concepts related to biological diversity. A large amount of time is spent outdoors working on field experiments, with a strong emphasis placed on field techniques and analyzing data collected on field excursions. Students observe environmental systems and in tandem develop and synthesize experimental designs. Additionally, they are required to maintain detailed lab journals and demonstrate the use and appropriate techniques associated with class and field experiments. Students analyze and interpret data, including mathematical, statistical and graphical evaluations. Students generate laboratory reports that draw conclusions based on data, and assess their validity and reliability. Note: All students enrolled in this course must take the AP Environmental Science exam in the spring.

Advanced Placement Physics II: Algebra-Based

Advanced Placement Physics II: Algebra-Based

Grades Course Open To: 11-12

Credit: 1.0 - weighted for AP

Prerequisite: Grade of B or better in Accelerated Algebra II Honors, grade of B or better in AP Physics I, and grade of B or better in Chemistry Honors; or consent of Division Chair

Fees: AP Physics II exam (paid at fall registration)

This course follows an upper-level, college-oriented curriculum, and is designed to prepare students for college courses in physics and chemistry. It is highly recommended for students who plan on pursuing a degree in science, engineering or the medical field. The course emphasizes problem solving, mathematical analysis and laboratory experiments, and is intended for highly motivated students. Subjects covered include fluid mechanics; thermodynamics; electricity and magnetism; optics; and atomic and nuclear physics. This course is equivalent to a second-semester college course in algebra-based physics. Additional time outside of class is required in order to complete the course work. Note: All students enrolled in this course must take the AP Physics II exam in the spring.

Anatomy & Physiology Honors

Anatomy & Physiology Honors

Grades Course Open To: 11-12

Credit: 1.0 - Honors credit

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Integrated Science or Biology Honors, and successful completion of Chemistry or Chemistry Honors

This course presents a thorough and detailed study of the relationship between the structure and form of the human body and the chemical and physical processes that allow it to function. Students gain a working knowledge of concepts and basic vocabulary related to anatomy and physiology. Body systems are taught through unifying themes of complementary structure and function, the interrelationships of body systems and homeostatic mechanism. Students are also introduced to pathological conditions. Students are required to participate in laboratory exercises that may include dissection.

Astronomy

Astronomy

Grades Course Open To: 11-12

Credit: 0.5

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Integrated Science or Biology Honors; and successful completion of, or concurrent enrollment in, Physics Foundations, Physics, or Physics Honors

This course, which focuses on the study of the universe around us, is designed for college-bound students who wish to take a science elective without the use of advanced mathematics. The course illustrates how the universe works, and covers topics related to the history of astronomy, forces of nature, the space program, the solar system, and the birth and evolution of stars. Demonstrations, group interaction, lectures and audio-visual materials all are utilized to help students gain a better understanding of the subject matter.

Biotechnology

Biotechnology

Grades Course Open To: 11-12

Credit: 0.5

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Integrated Science or Biology Honors; successful completion of Chemistry Foundations, Chemistry or Chemistry Honors; and successful completion of Physics Foundations, Physics or Physics Honors

This course is designed for students interested in careers in the medical field and other biology fields, and illustrates the impact science has on everyday life. Concepts of biotechnology are used to teach science principles and how they affect one’s daily life, including human relationships with the ecosystem and ethical issues relating to biotechnology. Students explore biotechnology issues and ethics, DNA composition, cloning, human genome project, embryology, forensic science, bacteria, viruses, twin studies, relatedness, immunology, cancer, mutations and genetic engineering. Additionally, students create their own Web page to post projects and essays on the Internet. A strong knowledge of cells, including cell structure, mitosis, meiosis and DNA, is highly recommended.

Botany

Botany

Grades Course Open To: 10-11-12

Credit: 0.5

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Integrated Science or Biology Honors

This course presents the basic concepts of plant and insect biology, helping students to recognize and identify common flowering plants and insects in the local region. Students take part in a number of field trips, including ones in which they study local plant species, insect species, and their relationship in the ecosystem. Students compare and contrast basic types of vegetative and reproductive anatomy - including leaves, stems, roots, flowers and fruits - as well as various mechanisms of pollination. The areas of coevolution and pollination, botany economics, horticulture, phylogenetic trees, vegetation analysis and invasive species also are addressed. The course includes a strong field laboratory component and includes traditional lab studies.

Environmental Science

Environmental Science

Grades Course Open To: 11-12

Credit: 1.0

Prerequisite: Successful completion of two science credits, including Integrated Science or Biology Honors

This course places a strong emphasis on field research that uses a hands-on approach, with the primary focus on Illinois ecology. Through activities such as fish shocking, bird banding, winter tracking and informational “walk abouts,” students gather data and discuss their findings in class in order to assist in monitoring prairie, forest, lake, river, wetland and urban ecosystems; essentially, they become student scientists directly involved in the monitoring of our local ecology. The course emphasizes the importance of biodiversity in our local and global systems, and analyzes current events in order to understand the importance of the protection of the planet. Students explore global issues through a variety of methods, and develop critical thinking skills through laboratory analysis and field experiments. Because the course is designed for outdoor intensive exploration and class field trips are conducted throughout the year, students should be prepared for all types of weather conditions.

Geology

Geology

Grades Course Open To: 10-11-12

Credit: 1.0

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Integrated Science or Biology Honors

This introductory course is designed to be hands-on and lab-oriented, and provides students with working knowledge of the concepts and basic vocabulary related to geology and Earth science. Students take part in a number of field trips, including ones to local areas that show land formation processes and allow for the search for fossils; topographic maps and GPS devices are utilized on these trips. Areas of study include plate tectonics in relation to earthquakes, volcanoes and land formations; as well as other forces, such as weathering, glaciations, winds, waves and currents, that shape the Earth’s physical features. The history of the Earth also is explored, with topics including fossils, minerals and rock formation types. Students also construct towers that are subjected to the forces of an earthquake.

Invertebrate Zoology

Invertebrate Zoology

Grades Course Open To: 10-11-12

Credit: 0.5

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Integrated Science or Biology Honors

This course provides students with an opportunity to learn more about invertebrates, the special role they play in the environment, and the importance of these organisms to the biosphere. Students are introduced to the morphology, physiology, taxonomy and behavior of a variety of invertebrate organisms. Invertebrates (animals lacking a backbone) do not constitute a uniform group, but compromise all of the approximately 30 different phyla of the animal kingdom. The distribution, systematics, relationships and ecology of these organisms is studied in detail, with an emphasis on unity amid diversity, evolution and ecology.

Meteorology

Meteorology

Grades Course Open To: 10-11-12

Credit: 0.5

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Integrated Science or Biology Honors, and successful completion of, or concurrent enrollment in, Physics Foundations or Physics

This course introduces students to meteorological events, such as tornadoes, lightning and hurricanes, in order to provide them with a working knowledge of the concepts and basic vocabulary related to the subject. The class covers major weather events, as well as the technology used to forecast these events. Students are introduced to concepts and techniques used by meteorologists to predict weather, as well as the major concepts of meteorology and climate changes. Areas of study include the Earth’s atmosphere, isotherms, water cycle, acid rain, storms, ozone, clouds, and tools used by meteorologists. Students participate in class projects that lead up to them forecasting the weather themselves.

Science Competitions

Science Competitions

Grades Course Open To: 11-12

Credit: 0.5

Prerequisite: Successful completion of two science credits, including Integrated Science or Biology Honors; and consent of Division Chair

Intended for students who demonstrate superior academic performance, this course provides students with the opportunity to pursue in-depth study of their field of choice through various academic challenges and/or competitions. Students are engaged in a variety of science endeavors, and are expected to participate in organized competition(s). This course may be repeated for credit. Note: This course is not accepted by the NCAA Eligibility Center.

Zoology

Zoology

Grades Course Open To: 10-11-12

Credit: 0.5

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Integrated Science or Biology Honors

This course discusses the basic nature of life as it is understood today, and illustrates to students the special role all organisms play in the animal kingdom and their importance to the overall health of an ecosystem. The course addresses the basic principles of zoology and the relationships animals play within the environment. Students analyze animals’ activities, growth, reproduction, embryological development and their relationships within the biosphere. An emphasis is placed on organisms from simple coelenterates through complex mammals.

Health Education

Health Education

Grades Course Open To: 9

Credit: 0.5

Prerequisite: None

This course is designed to help students realize the importance of health, wellness and safe living. Students are presented with information based on the three aspects of health, present day problems, systems of the body, and careers in health-related fields. Textbooks, current health-related articles, visual materials and models of various systems all enhance students’ learning experience, and technology is incorporated into the curriculum when appropriate. Students are expected to acquire knowledge needed to live a life abundant with health, wellness and safety, and be able to make health-related decisions in a mature and educated manner throughout their lives. Topics of study include the definition of physical, mental and social health, nutrition, physical fitness, diseases, drug use, the cycle of life, systems of the body and AIDS education.

Physical Education I

Physical Education I

Grades Course Open To: 9

Credit: 0.5

Prerequisite: None

Fees: Physical Education uniform (shorts, shirt), heart rate monitor strap

This course employs a structured format designed to build students’ foundations in the areas of team building, fitness, and individual and team activities, as well as how to effectively respond to emergency situations through Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR) training. Activities include team building, team games, physical fitness principles, heart rate monitor usage for improving cardiovascular fitness, indoor wall climbing, badminton, tennis, and CPR. Students will utilize a heart rate monitor during the fitness component of each unit. Students are expected to show evidence of the knowledge acquired during each unit by taking unit tests and a written final exam. Students must wear their physical education uniform and bring their heart monitors to class daily. School-issued sweatpants are available at an additional cost and are the only acceptable alternative to wearing the required Physical Education uniform.

Physical Education II, III & IV

Physical Education II, III & IV

Grades Course Open To: 10-11-12

Credit: 1.0

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Physical Education I

Fees: Physical Education uniform (shorts, shirt), heart rate monitor strap, lock - if replacements are needed; bowling trip fee

In this course, students choose six activities per semester, with each taking place over seven class periods. These activities expand students’ skills and knowledge in the areas of individual and/or team activities. Students may train with heart rate monitors, have written and/or skill tests for each activity, and a fitness test during each activity unit. Basic motor skills of individual and team sports are emphasized, as are advanced skills when appropriate. Advanced knowledge of some individual and team sports, physical fitness, wellness and heart rate monitors is stressed. Students must wear their physical education uniform and bring their heart monitors to class daily. School-issued sweatpants are available at an additional cost and are the only acceptable alternative to wearing the required Physical Education uniform. No grade is given to students who are out of Physical Education during the six-week “Behind the Wheel” phase of Driver Education.

Adaptive Physical Education

Adaptive Physical Education

Grades Course Open To: 9-10-11-12

Credit: 0.5

Prerequisite: Doctor’s diagnosis and recommendation

Offered as an alternative to Physical Education I, II, III or IV for students who are on permanent medical restrictions, this course gives students written assignments that are due at the end of each period. Topics assigned could be related to the activity in progress, nutrition, general fitness, careers in recreation, or on a subject agreed upon by both the student and instructor. Students on limited or restricted physical education remain in the regular class and participate according to a checklist provided by a physician.

Competition Physical Education

Competition Physical Education

Grades Course Open To: 9-10-11-12

Credit: 1.0

Prerequisite: Approval by the course instructor and the student’s coach

Fees: Physical Education uniform (shorts, shirt), heart rate monitor strap, lock - if replacements are needed

This course is designed to give students the physical foundations needed for athletic competition, and - for sophomores, juniors and seniors - substitutes for the regular Physical Education course. It is divided into three phases: pre, in and off-season. The class focuses on increasing strength, improving conditioning, building agility and quickness, boosting lateral and straight line speed, enhancing flexibility, and hand/eye coordination during each phase of a season. This is done through weight lifting, ground based training, plyometrics, foot ladders, dot drills, jumping rope, and core exercises. The development of lean muscle mass helps students avoid injury and heal more quickly if an injury does occur. Dedication to the class enhances students’ success and gives them a competitive edge. Note: This course is intended for members of the football team.

Junior Honors Physical Education Leadership

Junior Honors Physical Education Leadership Program

Grades Course Open To: 11

Credit: 1.0 - Honors credit

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Physical Education I and II, minimum 3.0 GPA, recommendations by Physical Education teachers and staff

Fees: Cost of required t-shirt (pre-ordered at end of sophomore year)

This Honors level, methods course satisfies the Physical Education requirement for juniors. Students must apply for and be accepted into the program, which trains students to increase their lifelong leadership skills and prepares them to be Physical Education leaders as seniors. Skill development and analysis, officiating rules and techniques, teaching progressions, and methods of organizing and administering various types of activity classes (to assist instructors in routine classroom duties) are all emphasized. Students are expected to participate in class, complete written and practical assignments, maintain a year-long notebook and log, receive their CPR Certification, and display good character and responsible behavior.

Senior Honors Physical Education Leadership

Senior Honors Physical Education Leadership Program

Grades Course Open To: 12

Credit: 1.0 - Honors credit

Prerequisite: Grade of B or better in Junior Honors Physical Education Leadership Program

Fees: Cost of required t-shirt (pre-ordered at end of junior year)

This Honors level course satisfies the Physical Education requirement for seniors, and provides students with the chance to apply the training they received in the Junior Leadership course. Students are required to enroll for one period of laboratory experiences for the year, and are assigned as a student leader to a Physical Education I or II instructor. Student leaders primarily assist instructors with routine classroom management, small group instruction of basic skills, and officiating course activities. Students are expected to demonstrate exemplary leadership in and out of the classroom, and attend four pre-determined leadership group, in-house workshops throughout the year.

Outdoor Education

Outdoor Education

Grades Course Open To: 12

Credit: 0.5

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Physical Education I, II and III with a B average in those courses, no major discipline, and approval of the course’s instructor

Fees: Course fee applies (paid at fall registration)

This course provides senior students with an alternative to traditional physical education in the spring semester, with an emphasis on outdoor education, recreational and adventure-related activities. Book study, simulation and practical learning (when available) are all applied. Activities may include wilderness first aid, high ropes course, team building and cooperative learning skills, orienteering, camping skills, outdoor cooking, fly and bait cast fishing, basic canoeing, kayaking skills, snowshoeing, cross country skiing, indoor climbing/rappelling wall experience, and outdoor survival skills. Students are expected to perform well in all forms of evaluation and participate in all activities presented, including a camping weekend skill application experience in which they apply skills learned over the semester.

Pre-Essentials for Integrated Math

Pre-Essentials for Integrated Math

Grades Course Open To: 9-10-11-12

Credit: 1.0

Prerequisite: None

This course is designed to prepare students to master skills and concepts from previous years and to present new concepts that will prepare students for the Integrated Math curriculum. Mathematical Practices will be used in instruction and learning. The majority of the curriculum is based on students’ deficits identified at the beginning of the school year. Additionally, students focus on the ability to translate from the reading of material to the mathematical meanings. Note: This course is not accepted by the NCAA Eligibility Center.

Algebra I Applications

Algebra I Applications

Grades Course Open To: 10-11-12

Credit: 1.0

Prerequisite: Successful completion of one mathematics credit

This course is designed to investigate and develop algebraic concepts through the use of technology. Problems from the areas of linear, polynomial and exponential functions, systems of equations, series and sequences, graph analysis and trigonometry involve applications from business, finance, economics and consumer education. Both algebraic and graphical interpretation of data are stressed, as is the connection between the algebraic and graphical representations of data. Note: This course satisfies the Consumer Education requirement. Note: This course is not accepted by the NCAA Eligibility Center.

Integrated Math I GB

Integrated Math I GB

Grades Course Open To: 9-10-11-12

Credit: 2.0

Prerequisite: Placement based on student’s placement exam results

This is the first course of the Integrated Math curriculum. The course is rigorous, as students are expected to learn the concepts, be fluent at processing the skills, and be able to apply concepts to mathematical situations at the appropriate level. Students are expected to use the Mathematical Practices within the course. In all integrated courses, students address the areas of Numbers and Quantities, Functions, Statistics, Geometry and Algebra. Themes of this particular course are centered around linear relationships, exponential relationships, concepts of functions and the interpretation of functions, representing and interpreting statistical data, algebraic connections to coordinate geometry, and geometric proofs through transformations. The course meets daily, which allows students to develop a proficiency in skills and comprehension of the mathematics language. Note: This course is accepted for one credit by the NCAA Eligibility Center.

Integrated Math I

Integrated Math I

Grades Course Open To: 9-10-11-12

Credit: 1.0

Prerequisite: Placement based on student’s placement exam results

This is the first course of the Integrated Math curriculum. The course is rigorous, as students are expected to learn the concepts, be fluent at processing the skills, and be able to apply concepts to mathematical situations at the appropriate level. Students are expected to use the Mathematical Practices within the course. In all integrated courses, students address the areas of Numbers and Quantities, Functions, Statistics, Geometry and Algebra. Themes of this particular course are centered around linear relationships, exponential relationships, concepts of functions and the interpretation of functions, representing and interpreting statistical data, algebraic connections to coordinate geometry, and geometric proofs through transformations.

Algebra II AB

Algebra II AB

Grades Course Open To: 10-11-12

Credit: 2.0

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Algebra I or Algebra I AB

This course provides a review of the basic terminology, concepts, skills and applications presented in Algebra I, and emphasizes theory and sophistication in mathematics. A number of new topics are introduced and studied in depth, including absolute value equations, matrices, quadratics, irrational numbers, complex numbers, rational expressions, logarithms and statistics. The course provides students with the terminology, skill and algebraic background necessary for success in college mathematics. Major units of study include equations and inequalities, linear equations and functions, linear systems and matrices, quadratic functions and factoring, polynomials, rational exponents and radical functions, exponential and logarithmic functions, rational functions, and data analysis and statistics. The course meets daily, which provides students with better retention and an opportunity for additional tutoring in the subject matter. Note: This course is accepted for one credit by the NCAA Eligibility Center.

Algebra II

Algebra II

Grades Course Open To: 10-11-12

Credit: 1.0

Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in Algebra I or grade of B or better in Algebra I AB

This course provides a review of the basic terminology, concepts, skills and applications presented in Algebra I, and emphasizes theory and sophistication in mathematics. A number of new topics are introduced and studied in depth, including absolute value equations, matrices, quadratics, irrational numbers, complex numbers, rational expressions, logarithms and statistics. The course provides students with the terminology, skill and algebraic background necessary for success in college mathematics. Major units of study include equations and inequalities, linear equations and functions, linear systems and matrices, quadratic functions and factoring, polynomials, rational exponents and radical functions, exponential and logarithmic functions, rational functions, and data analysis and statistics.

Geometry Applications

Geometry Applications

Grades Course Open To: 10-11-12

Credit: 1.0

Prerequisite: Successful completion of one mathematics credit

This course is designed for students who may be apprehensive about the content in the standard geometry course or who may not have found success in previous math courses. Basic geometry topics and concepts are introduced and reinforced, as students experience “hands on” projects and applications and observe “real life” uses of geometry. Concrete examples and projects provide additional opportunities for students to understand geometric concepts and gain success with the material. The student is familiarized with basic terms, useful language, symbolism and definitions common to a geometry course. Some topics include geometric art, angles, perpendicular lines; congruent and right triangles, similarity, circles, area, perimeter, volume, transformations and tessellations. This course may be taken concurrently with Geometry. Note: This course is not accepted by the NCAA Eligibility Center.

Geometry

Geometry

Grades Course Open To: 10-11-12

Credit: 1.0

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Algebra II or grade of C or better in Algebra II AB

This course introduces and studies in depth the concepts of geometry, and is recommended for all college-bound students. The coursework includes basic geometric definitions and shapes, triangle congruence, similar triangles, parallel and perpendicular lines, quadrilaterals, circles, area and volume of geometric figures, and proofs. Students become familiar with all basic terms and definitions in relation to the coursework, which are of value in later mathematics courses and applications. This course may be taken concurrently with Trigonometry.

Accelerated Geometry Honors

Accelerated Geometry Honors

Grades Course Open To: 9-10-11

Credit: 1.0 - Honors credit

Prerequisite: Grade of B or better in Accelerated Algebra II Honors; concurrent enrollment in Accelerated Trigonometry Honors

This advanced-level course is the second in the accelerated mathematics sequence, and is designed to develop and enhance students’ ability to analyze a problem while maintaining their algebra skills. Students learn to read mathematical exposition, analyze and solve problems that are geometric in nature, and realize the importance of course concepts in their everyday lives. Students become familiar with all basic terms, definitions, useful language and symbolism in relation to the coursework, which are of value in later mathematics courses and applications. Among the many topics covered in this rigorous course are elements of geometry, angles and perpendicular lines, congruent and right triangles, similarity, circles, areas and volumes, coordinate geometry, logic and proofs.

Trigonometry

Trigonometry

Grades Course Open To: 10-11-12

Credit: 0.5

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Geometry; or, for concurrent enrollment in Geometry, grade of C or better in Algebra II

This course is designed for students who intend to pursue mathematics beyond the Algebra II level, or for those who are interested in careers involving engineering, mathematics, physics, architecture or drafting. It includes a thorough introduction to trigonometry concepts that are necessary for further study of mathematics and physics at the college level, and is highly recommended for all college-bound students. Students work to master a number of trig concepts, including right triangle trig, trig functions, trig equations, trig identities, the unit circle, area of a triangle, law of sines and cosines, graphing functions, and numerous applications.

Accelerated Trigonometry Honors

Accelerated Trigonometry Honors

Grades Course Open To: 9-10-11

Credit: 0.5 - Honors credit

Prerequisite: Grade of B or better in Accelerated Algebra II Honors; concurrent enrollment in Accelerated Geometry Honors

This advanced-level course covers trigonometry material in greater depth, and also introduces students to additional topics related to trigonometric concepts. Students study values of trigonometric functions, solving trigonometric equations, right triangle trigonometry, trigonometric identities and laws, applications and graphing trigonometric functions. This course is required for students who intend to take Accelerated Pre-Calculus Honors or AP Calculus BC at the high school level.

Pre-Calculus

Pre-Calculus

Grades Course Open To: 10-11-12

Credit: 1.0

Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in Geometry or successful completion of Accelerated Geometry Honors; and successful completion of, or current enrollment in, Trigonometry

This course is designed to prepare students for Calculus, helping them obtain a deeper mathematical comprehension of the material. It is a collaboration of material from previous courses, of which students should have a solid foundation, and new concepts. A variety of functions are studied, including linear, polynomial, rational, exponential, logarithmic, inverse and piece-wise. Additionally, the course correlates algebraic concepts with graphical representations of the material. The language of functions is used extensively. Course material also includes the study of series and sequences, conics and limits.

Accelerated Pre-Calculus Honors

Accelerated Pre-Calculus Honors

Grades Course Open To: 10-11-12

Credit: 1.0 - Honors credit

Prerequisite: Grades of B or better in Accelerated Algebra II Honors, Accelerated Geometry Honors and Accelerated Trigonometry Honors

This course is a continuation of the “accelerated mathematics sequence,” introduces students to advanced mathematical concepts, and serves as a preparatory course for Calculus. The curriculum is based on materials developed for the Mathematics Investigations course offered by the Illinois Math & Science Academy (IMSA). It concentrates on the study of matrices, functions (linear, polynomial, rational, logarithmic, exponential, parametric and piece-wise), series and sequences, theory of equations and analytic geometry, and also provides an introduction to combinatorics. Students enrolled in this course must have a good grasp of algebraic, geometric and trigonometric concepts.

Calculus

Calculus

Grades Course Open To: 11-12

Credit: 1.0 - Honors credit

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Pre-Calculus, and placement tests administered by Joliet Junior College [Class of 2018 – grade of C or better in Integrated Math III and grade of C or better in STEM Math]

This course is the first in a college-level Calculus sequence. Students must demonstrate mastery of concepts and skills learned in previous courses. The course content is comprised of linear, polynomial, logarithmic and exponential functions. Students develop all basic concepts of differential and integral calculus of functions in one variable. A thorough discussion of the concept of limits and its application to advanced mathematics is included. Other major topics covered are the nature and applications of the integral, techniques of integration, and elementary differential equations. Several applications are studied, such as area and optimization of functions. The calculus of transcendental functions is also part of this course. Transferable credit (5.0 hours) from Joliet Junior College is given upon successful completion of the course.

Advanced Placement Calculus BC

Advanced Placement Calculus BC

Grades Course Open To: 11-12

Credit: 1.5 - weighted for AP

Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in Accelerated Pre-Calculus Honors, and placement tests administered by Joliet Junior College [Class of 2018 – grade of B or better in Integrated Math III Honors and grade of B or better in STEM Math Honors]

Fees: AP Calculus BC exam (paid at fall registration)

This is one of the top-level courses offered by the mathematics department, and can be the equivalent of two semesters of calculus courses offered at the college level. Students must demonstrate mastery of concepts and skills learned in previous courses. The course content is comprised of linear, polynomial, logarithmic, exponential, polar and vector functions, and introduces and develops all basic concepts of limits and their application to advanced mathematics. Fundamental integration, as well as advanced integration techniques, are examined. Other topics include: solving differential equations, infinite series, and power series for elementary functions. Only those students who intend to take college-level mathematics courses and who have shown a high degree of aptitude in previous mathematics courses should enroll. The course meets daily in the first semester, and every other day in the second semester. Note: All students enrolled in this course must take the AP Calculus BC exam in the spring.

Advanced Placement Statistics

Advanced Placement Statistics

Grades Course Open To: 11-12

Credit: 1.0 - weighted for AP

Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in Accelerated Algebra II Honors and Accelerated Geometry Honors; or grade of B or better in Algebra II; or grade of B or better in Pre-Calculus [Class of 2018 – grade of C or better in any level of Integrated Math III]

Fees: AP Statistics exam (paid at fall registration)

This advanced-level course introduces students to the major concepts and tools for collecting, analyzing and drawing conclusions from data. Students are exposed to four broad conceptual themes: exploring data, planning a study, anticipating patterns, and statistical inferences. Among the many topics discussed are: interpreting graphical displays of distribution, summarizing and comparing distributions, exploring bivariate and categorical data, methods of data collection, planning and conducting surveys and experiments, generalizability of results from observations and experiments, probability as relative frequency, combining independent random variables, confidence intervals, tests of significance, and special cases of normally distributed data. Students who are successful in this course may receive advanced placement, college credit or both for a one-semester introductory college statistics course. Note: All students enrolled in this course must take the AP Statistics exam in the spring.

Advanced Calculus

Advanced Calculus

Grades Course Open To: 11-12

Credit: 0.5 or 1.0 (depends on college arrangement) - Honors credit

Prerequisite: Score of 4 or 5 on the AP Calculus BC Exam

Fees: May be assessed based on the institution offering the dual credit

The most advanced mathematics course offered by the department, this is the third course in calculus and analytic geometry, and is the equivalent of a one-semester course offered at the college level. Major units of study include functions of several variables, partial derivatives, parametric plotting, vectors, perpendicularity, 2D integration, gradients, trajectories, 2D and 3D measurements, sources and sinks, transforming 2D and 3D integrals, spherical coordinates and 3D flow. Only those students who intend to take college-level mathematics courses and have shown a high degree of aptitude in previous mathematics courses should enroll. This course may be taught off-campus at another local institution, and college credit typically is awarded upon successful completion of the course.

French I

French I

Grades Course Open To: 9-10-11-12

Credit: 1.0

Prerequisite: None

This course begins the process of developing French language communication skills. This course teaches the basic skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing in French. Basic language patterns, pronunciation and vocabulary are practiced in class and at home. The course includes the study of Francophone cultures and traditions. The skills and understandings learned will be valuable for travel and employment opportunities, and the course also should help students improve their English language skills.

French II

French II

Grades Course Open To: 9-10-11-12

Credit: 1.0

Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in French I or teacher consent; students may also be placed into the course based on their performance on the French I final exam

This course builds upon the knowledge of French I and uses a similar classroom format. After a review of material from French I, students study more sophisticated grammar and syntax and are introduced to vocabulary that is applicable to upper-level study and overseas travel, with a goal of obtaining functional reading ability by the end of the course. Verbs that were previously learned are reviewed and used to form new tenses. The focus of cultural study is daily French life. Students complete more oral presentations and begin to demonstrate fluency in writing.

French III Honors

French III Honors

Grades Course Open To: 9-10-11-12

Credit: 1.0 - Honors credit

Prerequisite: Grade of B or better in French II or teacher consent; students may also be placed into the course based upon their performance on the French II final exam

This advanced-level course provides students with most of the remaining grammar base needed for college-level study. Student mastery of material presented in French I and II is required in order for the class to perform at a high level. The course is grammar-intensive and readies students for advanced study. Linguistic structures enable students to produce increasingly sophisticated writing and speech. Reading selections and compositions help students exercise these skills.

French IV Honors

French IV Honors

Grades Course Open To: 9-10-11-12

Credit: 1.0 - Honors credit

Prerequisite: Grade of B or better in French III or teacher consent; students may also be placed into the course based upon their performance on the French III Honors final exam

The culmination of the French curriculum, the focus of this course is French history, civilization and literature. Literary selections from the Gallo-Roman era to the Enlightenment are used as tools for instruction. These selections, as well as a review of grammar, are presented in an all-French text. Students participate in oral drills, games and activities to develop an ease with the spoken language; they are also expected to demonstrate a sophisticated level of writing.

German I

German I

Grades Course Open To: 9-10-11-12

Credit: 1.0

Prerequisite: None

This course begins the process of developing German language communication skills. This course teaches the basic skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing in German. Basic language patterns, pronunciation and vocabulary are practiced in class and at home. The course includes the study of Germanic cultures and traditions. The skills and understandings learned will be valuable for travel and employment opportunities, and the course also should help students improve their English language skills.

German II

German II

Grades Course Open To: 9-10-11-12

Credit: 1.0

Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in German I or teacher consent; students may also be placed into the course based upon their performance on the German I final exam

A continuation of German I, this course furthers vocabulary and grammar knowledge necessary for an understanding of the language. Included among the major grammar topics are the conversational past, reflexives, dative case and interrogatives. Students learn a wide range of vocabulary. Various media are used in instruction, including print, video and audio. Technology is highly integrated into the course, including the use of the Internet.

German III Honors

German III Honors

Grades Course Open To: 9-10-11-12

Credit: 1.0 - Honors credit

Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in German II or teacher consent; students may also be placed into the course based upon their performance on the German II final exam

This advanced-level course refines and expands upon the vocabulary and grammar learned in German I and II. The course is grammar-intensive and readies students for advanced study. Included among the major grammar topics of study are verb tenses, prepositions, use of adjectives and infinitive clauses. Students expand their vocabulary and grammar skills to communicate in a more sophisticated manner. Various media are used in instruction, including print, video and audio. Technology is highly integrated into the course, including the use of the Internet.

German IV Honors

German IV Honors

Grades Course Open To: 9-10-11-12

Credit: 1.0 - Honors credit

Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in German III or teacher consent; students may also be placed into the course based upon their performance on the German III Honors final exam

The culmination of the German curriculum, this advanced-level course completes the study of major verb tenses and cases. Grammar topics include the genitive case, gerunds and relative clauses, as well as verb tenses and moods. Students expand their vocabulary to discuss opinions, emotions and future goals, so that their writing becomes more complex. Additionally, authentic literature, history and business language are explored at this level. Various materials are used in instruction, including video and audio. The course is taught primarily in the target language.

Spanish I

Spanish I

Grades Course Open To: 9-10-11-12

Credit: 1.0

Prerequisite: None

This course begins the process of developing Spanish language communication skills. This course teaches the basic skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing in Spanish. Basic language patterns, pronunciation and vocabulary are practiced in class and at home. The course includes the study of Hispanic cultures and traditions. The skills and understandings learned will be valuable for travel and employment opportunities, and the course also should help students improve their English language skills.

Spanish II

Spanish II

Grades Course Open To: 9-10-11-12

Credit: 1.0

Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in Spanish I or teacher consent; students may also be placed into the course based upon their performance on the Spanish I final exam

This course is a continuation of Spanish I, with an extensive study of increased grammar and vocabulary. A greater emphasis is placed on reading comprehension, pronunciation, speaking and writing skills. Students increase their communicative abilities by learning and applying advanced grammatical structures. Students are expected to increasingly express themselves in the language through class participation.

Spanish III Honors

Spanish III Honors

Grades Course Open To: 9-10-11-12

Credit: 1.0 - Honors credit

Prerequisite: Grade of B or better in Spanish II or teacher consent; students may also be placed into the course based on their performance on the Spanish II final exam

This advanced-level course reviews and expands the concepts and skills studied in Spanish I and II, and emphasizes reading, writing, speaking and listening with more fluency and sophistication. This course is grammar intensive and readies students for advanced study. Linguistic structures assist students in demonstrating sophisticated writing and speaking skills. Reading selections and compositions help students exercise these skills.

Spanish III Honors Accelerated

Spanish III Honors Accelerated

Grades Course Open To: 10-11-12

Credit: 1.0 - Honors credit

Prerequisite: Grade of A in Spanish II or teacher consent; students may also be placed into the course by earning an A on the Spanish II final exam and with consent of the Division Chair

This course is designed for highly advanced students, as it reviews and expands the concepts and skills introduced in Spanish II. In a culturally enriched environment, students further develop speaking, listening, reading and writing skills through a variety of learning techniques. Language skills are acquired on a more sophisticated level, incorporating higher order thinking skills. An emphasis is placed on student participation in class, and students memorize vocabulary and grammar concepts to facilitate appropriate usage. Students must be independent learners with excellent study skills and habits in order to maintain high academic standards throughout this fast-paced class. Students must display excellent time management skills in order to meet the demands of the curriculum. Mastery of the material presented requires daily study and practice outside of the classroom setting. The course is especially useful for students who plan to attend major universities or who will be seeking advanced college placement.

Spanish IV Honors

Spanish IV Honors

Grades Course Open To: 9-10-11-12

Credit: 1.0 - Honors credit

Prerequisite: Grade of B or better in Spanish III or teacher consent; students may also be placed into the course based on their performance on the Spanish III final exam

This advanced-level course is a culmination of the Spanish curriculum, and concentrates on reading, speaking, listening and writing in order to help students develop a level of proficiency. The course provides a review and extended application of language principals learned at previous levels, while also enhancing the students’ vocabulary and grammar base to allow for advanced placement at the university level. Students gain knowledge of the history of Spain and other Spanish-speaking countries through readings, lectures, class discussions and films. An emphasis is placed on practical application of grammatical structures in oral conversation, reading and written compositions.

Spanish IV Honors Accelerated

Spanish IV Honors Accelerated

Grades Course Open To: 11-12

Credit: 1.0 - Honors credit

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Spanish III Honors Accelerated or Grade of A in Spanish III Honors

In addition to providing a thorough review of Spanish grammar and structure, this college-level course places an emphasis on increasing students’ ability to communicate. Students become increasingly proficient at expressing their thoughts, feelings and opinions on a variety of matters. The students’ knowledge of Hispanic history, cultures and traditions is enhanced through reading and other types of media. The course is conducted entirely in the target language, with a focus on developing students’ audio-lingual skills. Mastery of the required skills requires daily study and practice outside of the classroom setting. The course is especially useful for students who plan to attend major universities or who will be seeking advanced college placement.

Spanish for Heritage Speakers

Spanish for Heritage Speakers

Grades Course Open To: 9-10-11-12

Credit: 1.0

Prerequisite: Spanish spoken and understood in the student’s home; performance on placement exams and teacher recommendation

This course is designed for students whose heritage language is Spanish, and addresses the skills and challenges they face when reading, writing, speaking and reading in their first language. Emphasizing oral comprehension, communication, vocabulary and grammatical structure within a literary context, the course develops these skills with a focus on problematic areas for heritage speakers. Additionally, students learn about Spanish-speaking cultures from around the world. Students are encouraged to participate in class, and devote time to memorizing vocabulary and grammar. Mastery of the required skills requires daily study and practice outside of the classroom setting. The course is especially useful for students who plan to attend major universities or who will be seeking advanced college placement. The course is conducted almost exclusively in Spanish and prepares students for both Spanish IV Honors Accelerated.

Introduction to Studio Art

Introduction to Studio Art 

Grades Course Open To: 9-10-11-12

Credit: 1.0

Prerequisite: None

This course is designed to give the beginning art student a basic foundation in art elements, principles and media. Students are introduced to art techniques and media through sketching, drawing, printmaking and painting assignments. The course expands students’ art experience through studio art while recognizing the value of art history. Students are expected to look at and discuss both historical and contemporary works of art. Effort and participation are emphasized to foster a positive life-long appreciation for the visual arts.

Studio Art II

Studio Art II

Grades Course Open To: 10-11-12

Credit: 1.0

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Introduction to Studio Art, Introduction to Digital Art, or Introduction to Drawing & Painting

This course explores complex problems and media, with work centered on fewer topics. More time is spent on innovation and creativity within a given area, and students receive constructive critiques of their work. Art principles are reviewed and drawing skills are reinforced. Brief surveys of selected periods of art history are incorporated with studio projects to reinforce ideas and techniques. In addition to in-depth study in sketching, drawing and painting, students are introduced to the process of silk screening.

Studio Art III

Studio Art III 

Grades Course Open To: 11-12

Credit: 1.0

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Studio Art II or Drawing & Painting II, or consent of Division Chair

This studio course is offered to advanced art students who wish to enrich their background in art. Areas of study may include advanced drawing, painting, printmaking, mixed media, and alternative media. Students explore current trends in contemporary art from Chicago and other major urban art scenes, and examine and discuss both historical and contemporary works of art. Students are challenged, both within and outside the classroom, to utilize past and present art experiences to create new and exciting studio projects from influences around them. For students interested in pursuing art in college, a portfolio of work may be developed. Each student’s goal for this course will be to have his or her art displayed in a public setting.

Studio Art IV

Studio Art IV

Grades Course Open To: 12

Credit: 1.0

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Studio Art III, or concurrent enrollment in Studio Art III with consent of Division Chair

This studio course is offered to advanced art students who wish to pursue an intense study of advanced drawing, painting, printmaking, mixed media, and alternative media. Students explore current trends in contemporary art from Chicago and other major urban art scenes, and examine and discuss both historical and contemporary works of art. Students utilize past and present art experiences to influence them in creating studio projects. Students at this level are expected to challenge themselves to grow in their personal creativity, problem solving, and artistic expression through advanced use of media. Each student’s goal for this course is to have his or her art displayed in a public setting. Those students who plan to pursue art in college may continue to develop their portfolio of artwork.

Ceramics & 3D Media

Ceramics & 3D Media

Grades Course Open To: 10-11-12

Credit: 1.0

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Introduction to Studio Art, Introduction to Computer Art, or Introduction to Drawing & Painting

This course is designed to explore ceramics and other three-dimensional media. An emphasis is placed on the slab, coil and pinch methods of ceramic construction, as well as on the basics of three-dimensional media. Students research the history of ceramics and sculpture, gain a basic understanding of the processes of ceramic and three-dimensional art, and learn terminology specific to the craft. Students are taught to combine three-dimensional construction methods and decoration to create sculptural and functional pieces. This course may be taken up to three times, upon consent of the Division Chair.

Introduction to Digital Art

Introduction to Digital Art

Grades Course Open To: 9-10-11-12

Credit: 1.0

Prerequisite: None

This course teaches students how to use the computer as an artistic tool. Students are introduced to Creative Suite 5, which includes Adobe Photoshop, Adobe Illustrator and Adobe InDesign. Students learn how to take and manipulate photographs and create original works of art using graphic design programs. Creative interpretation is developed through the use of additional hardware such as the digital camera, drawing tablet, scanners and various printing techniques. Students are required to have access to a digital camera for assignments.

Introduction to Drawing & Painting

Introduction to Drawing & Painting

Grades Course Open To: 9-10-11-12

Credit: 1.0

Prerequisite: None

This course provides students with a foundation in drawing and painting techniques. Students learn the elements and principles of art, and how to incorporate them in a creation of their own. Students develop drawing and painting techniques essential for understanding space, depth and form. Students are trained to become observers both of light and space, and how to apply what they see visually into a drawing or painting. Students are expected to develop their drawing and painting skills through accurate observation, and practice drawing techniques with various media.

Drawing & Painting II

Drawing & Painting II

Grades Course Open To: 10-11-12

Credit: 1.0

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Introduction to Studio Art, Introduction to Digital Art, or Introduction to Drawing & Painting

This course builds on the techniques learned in Introduction to Drawing & Painting by allowing students to use their knowledge of the elements and principles of art while being challenged with more complex drawing and painting assignments. Students develop more advanced technical and observational skills in a wider range of drawing and painting processes and media.

Freshman/Sophomore Choir

Freshman/Sophomore Choir

Grades Course Open To: 9-10

Credit: 1.0

Prerequisite: None

This choir is recommended for any freshman or sophomore that has a love for music and wants to sing, regardless of musical background, and prepares students for the Junior/Senior Choir. A voice assignment audition takes place during the first two full weeks of school; no prior musical knowledge is needed. The choir rehearses every other day for one full class period. It performs a number of musical styles, ranging from classical to contemporary and from rock to Broadway, at various concerts throughout the year, and may also appear at civic and community functions. Vocal technique, warm-up exercises using the full vocal range, vocal styles and phrasing and vocal patterns are all addressed.

Concert Band

Concert Band

Grades Course Open To: 9-10-11-12

Credit: 1.0

Prerequisite: Participation in Marching Band and Director’s approval

Open to qualified performers and incorporating students from all grade levels, the Concert Band strives for fine musical results and aims to develop each student’s overall musical proficiency. With a full schedule of performances during the year, the Concert Band rehearses daily and one evening per week. An emphasis is placed on music reading, counting, tone production, ensemble playing, listening and intonation. Students perform music that they enjoy and from which they can learn, including marches, pop music, ethnic music, and traditional and contemporary band selections. Students are expected to practice outside of rehearsals in order to prepare for class. During the spring semester, the Concert Band may be divided into two separate ensembles based on playing ability, instrumentation and a first-semester audition.

Symphonic Band Honors

Symphonic Band Honors

Grades Course Open To: 9-10-11-12

Credit: 0.5 (Spring only) - Honors credit

Prerequisite: Participation in Marching Band and Director’s approval

The Symphonic Band includes a select group of dedicated performers from all grade levels who possess strong musical ability and a positive mental attitude. The group lends itself to school and community events in various musical ways. Open to students by audition only, the Symphonic Band rehearses daily and one evening per week, playing material that includes marches, pop music, ethnic music, and traditional and contemporary band selections. Because they play the highest caliber of music, students participating in the Symphonic Band are strongly encouraged to take private lessons. Students are expected to practice outside of rehearsals in order to prepare for class. All music performed by the Symphonic Band is of college-level difficulty.

Marching Band

Marching Band

Grades Course Open To: 9-10-11-12

Credit: 0.5 (Fall only)

Prerequisite: Participation in Concert Band and Director’s approval

The Marching Band is composed of instrumental students from the Concert and/or Symphonic Bands and color guard members. Open to qualified performers, it rehearses daily and one evening per week. The Marching Band performs at athletic events, school assemblies and other civic functions throughout the year, and also competes during both the fall and spring semesters. It performs music coordinated to moving drill forms that accentuate the music visually, so that an audience can both see and hear that the music being performed. Varying techniques for marching and performing music are introduced. An emphasis is placed upon tone production and technique, as well as the proper method of marching, body carriage, step size and the use of equipment to perform the marching show material, which can include marches, pop, half-time music and other traditional or contemporary selections.

Lab Jazz Band

Lab Jazz Band

Grades Course Open To: 9-10-11-12

Credit: 1.0

Prerequisite: Participation in Concert Band and Marching Band

Open to all qualified performers, the Lab Jazz Band performs beginning-level jazz literature in various styles, using proper instrumental techniques within the jazz idiom. The group rehearses daily and performs a number of times throughout the year at concerts, festivals and clinics. Simple chord structure and scales in various modes are studied in order to assist with improvisation of jazz solos within a given composition. Material for the Lab Jazz Band can include blues, pop, rock, and both classic and contemporary jazz selections.

Jazz Band

Jazz Band

Grades Course Open To: 10-11-12

Credit: 1.0

Prerequisite: Participation in Concert Band and Marching Band or Director’s approval

Open only to qualified performers who have participated in the Lab Jazz Band or have Director’s approval, the Jazz Band performs intermediate jazz literature in various styles, using proper instrumental techniques within the jazz idiom. The group rehearses daily and performs a number of times throughout the year at concerts, festivals and clinics. Advanced chord structure and scales in all modes are studied in order to assist with improvisation of jazz solos within a given composition. Students refine their skills and play a variety of material, including blues, pop, rock, and intermediate versions of classic and contemporary jazz selections.

Jazz Band Honors

Jazz Band Honors

Grades Course Open To: 10-11-12

Credit: 1.0 - Honors credit

Prerequisite: Participation in Concert Band and Director’s approval

Open only to select performers who have participated in the Lab Jazz Band, Jazz Band or have Director’s approval, the Honors Jazz Band performs and records college-level jazz literature in various styles, using proper instrumental techniques within the jazz idiom. The group rehearses daily and performs a number of times throughout the year at concerts, festivals and clinics. Alternative and complex chord structure and scales in all modes are studied in order to assist with improvisation of jazz solos within a given composition. Students work to perfect their skills and play a variety of advanced material, including blues, pop, rock, and classic and contemporary jazz selections. Members of the Honors Jazz Band receive skills necessary to prepare for college auditions and recording sessions, and may also receive instruction in the small jazz combo setting and extensive jazz sight-reading skills.

Percussion Ensemble

Percussion Ensemble

Grades Course Open To: 9-10-11-12

Credit: 0.5 (Spring only)

Prerequisite: By audition only

Open to all experienced, placement in the Percussion Ensemble is determined by a student’s audition and the Director’s recommendation. In some cases, percussion students may be placed in the Concert or Symphonic Bands. Incorporating both percussion ensemble music and Symphonic/Concert music, the course emphasizes developing technique, exploring the vast work of percussion music and sound, and the individual study of rudiments and exercises recommended by the Percussive Arts Society. Students perform in a variety of festivals, in addition to working with guest conductors. This class may be repeated for credit up to four semesters.

Music Theory

Music Theory

Grades Course Open To: 10-11-12

Credit: 0.5

Prerequisite: None

This course affords students the opportunity to learn the basics of harmony, melody and rhythm by composing and listening to musical styles ranging from Bach to rock. It covers the first semester of collegiate music theory and music history. A broad variety of musical styles are discussed, and the use of baroque theory is applied to popular music forms. Students are evaluated on aural skills and dictation, and compose their own works through the semester using industry standard software and collaborative tools.

Music Unlimited I

Music Unlimited I

Grades Course Open To: 10-11-12

Credit: 1.0

Prerequisite: Successful completion of two semesters of Rock n’ Roll Methods and teacher approval

This course allows students to individually study and develop the techniques of the production of music and multi-media presentation. Students further develop their music skills by pursuing the study of voice, acoustic or electric guitar, bass or string instrument, synthesizer, acoustics, digital information theory, music history, music literature, music composition and arranging, electronics, public address systems and audio-video equipment. Students generate music and multi-media presentations and are expected to complete a musical portfolio. The instructor works with each student to develop individual goals and ways to accomplish those goals.

Music Unlimited II

Music Unlimited II

Grades Course Open To: 11-12

Credit: 1.0

Prerequisite: Successful completion of two semesters of Music Unlimited I and teacher approval

This course allows students to individually study and perfect the techniques of the production of music and multi-media presentation. Students further develop their music skills by pursuing the advanced study of voice, acoustic or electric guitar, bass or string instrument, synthesizer, acoustics, digital information theory, music history, music literature, music composition and arranging, electronics, and audio-video equipment. Students generate music and multi-media presentations and are expected to complete a musical portfolio, using “Pro Tools” and “Final Cut.” The instructor works with each student to develop individual goals and ways to accomplish those goals.

Rock n’ Roll Methods

Rock n’ Roll Methods

Grades Course Open To: 9-10-11-12

Credit: 0.5

Prerequisite: None

This course offers students - regardless of their experience or background - an opportunity to learn about popular music styles, as well as the technologies available to create and record their own music electronically. The study of popular music is used to explore the effective elements of sound, songwriting and performance. Students do not need to have a formal music background; with industry-standard equipment and software, they are able to create, record and realize their creative potential. Students may take this course, which allows them to appreciate, compose and perform different music styles, for either one or two semesters. Students have the opportunity to produce several examples of guided, self-generated music, making the class suitable and appropriate for all ability levels. The course allows students to expand their prior knowledge of an instrument, voice, or music and recordings. Students who complete two semesters of this course are eligible to enroll in Music Unlimited.
 

Theatre Technology I

Theatre Technology I

Grades Course Open To: 9-10-11-12

Credit: 1.0

Prerequisite: None

This course introduces students to basic materials and techniques used in technical theatre production by employing a practical, hands-on environment in which they implement skills necessary to support Lemont High School plays, conferences, musicals and concerts. Students learn about the study and construction of stagecraft, lighting, design and technology and audio engineering techniques, and apply lecture material to projects for the school’s auditorium and theatre arts program. The course emphasizes a range of topics, ranging from stage safety and the basics of scene design to lighting, make-up and criticism. Students are expected to participate in several mandatory after-school events and clock 40 “hands-on” work hours for those events scheduled in the Performing Arts Center throughout each semester.
 

Theatre Technology II

Theatre Technology II

Grades Course Open To: 10-11-12

Credit: 1.0

Prerequisite:
Successful completion of Theatre Technology I

A continuation of Theatre Technology I, this advanced course continues to employ a practical, hands-on environment in which students implement skills necessary to support Lemont High School plays, conferences, musicals and concerts. Students learn about the study and construction of stagecraft, lighting, design and technology and audio engineering techniques, and apply lecture material to projects for the school’s auditorium and theatre arts program. The course introduces management skills that are required to run and train a crew for theatre productions. Students are expected to participate in several mandatory after-school events and clock 40 “hands-on” work hours for those events scheduled in the Performing Arts Center throughout each semester.

Theatre Technology III - Theatre Management

Theatre Technology III - Theatre Management

Grades Course Open To: 11-12

Credit:
1.0

Prerequisite:
Successful completion of Theatre Technology II

A continuation of Theatre Technology II, this advanced course focuses on the skills necessary to help manage Lemont High School plays, conferences, musicals and concerts. Students learn about the study of stage managing, producing, lighting design and technology, audio design and engineering techniques, and apply lecture material to projects for the school’s Performing Arts Center and theatre arts program. The course focuses on the management skills that are required to run and train a crew for theatre productions. Students are expected to participate in several mandatory after-school events and clock 40 “hands-on” work hours for those events scheduled in the Performing Arts Center throughout each semester.

Cultural Geography

Cultural Geography

Grades Course Open To: 9

Credit: 1.0

Prerequisite: None

This course introduces students to the concepts of cultural geography, helping them to learn the major regions of the world and compare and contrast, analyze and evaluate those regions through various themes. Through discussion, debate, simulations, research, lectures and role playing, students gain critical thinking skills and examine history, cultures, environment, demographics, economic systems and political systems of the world. The content of the course examines the commonalities among, and differences between, the world’s regions. Topics of study include, among others, map skills, world religions, regional histories, economics, political science, demographics and geography.
 

Consumer Education

Consumer Education

Grades Course Open To: 11-12

Credit: 0.5

Prerequisite: None

This course addresses skills that are necessary for students to possess in modern society. Students become aware of the benefits of being an effective consumer in America. They gain knowledge about taking out credit in their own names - including credit cards, college loans and home loans - and are exposed to different methods of saving and investing their money. Students also discover the important choices that consumers must consider when making major purchases, such as houses and automobiles. The course places a strong emphasis on financial planning for college and beyond. Note: This course, or an equivalent, is required for graduation from Lemont High School. Note: This course is not accepted by the NCAA Eligibility Center.
 

U.S. History

U.S. History

Grades Course Open To: 11-12

Credit: 1.0

Prerequisite: None

This course covers events related to the political, economic and social development of the United States, with attention given to the relationship of past events to current affairs. Students are introduced to basic concepts relative to American History, and are expected to discuss a broad variety of problems in American History by developing abilities to analyze critically, synthesize and evaluate subject matter. Through discussion, debate, simulations, lectures, role playing, and research papers, students study a number of areas, ranging from colonial development and the Revolutionary War, to the Civil War and Reconstruction, to World War I and II and new America.

Advanced Placement U.S. History

Advanced Placement U.S. History

Grades Course Open To: 11-12

Credit: 1.5 - weighted for AP

Prerequisite: Grade of B or better in any Social Studies courses taken as a freshman or sophomore, and grade of B or better in both English I (all levels) and English II (all levels)

Fees: AP U.S. History exam (paid at fall registration)

With a more advanced and in depth curriculum, this course covers events related to the political, economic and social development of the United States, with attention given to the relationship of past events to current affairs. The course provides students with analytical skills necessary to deal critically with problems and materials in this country’s history. Students are introduced to basic concepts relative to American History, and are expected to discuss a broad variety of problems in American History by developing abilities to analyze critically, synthesize and evaluate subject matter. Through discussion, debate, simulations, lectures, role playing, and research papers, students study a number of areas, ranging from colonial development and the Revolutionary War, to the Civil War and Reconstruction, to World War I and II and new America. This course involves mandatory summer reading and writing assignments that must be completed by the first day of class. Note: All students enrolled in this course must take the AP U.S. History exam in the spring.

Advanced Placement American Government

Advanced Placement American Government

Grades Course Open To: 12

Credit: 1.0 - weighted for AP

Prerequisite: Grade of B or better in any Social Studies courses taken as a freshman, sophomore or junior, and grade of B or better in English I (all levels), English II (all levels) and English III (all levels)

Fees: AP American Government exam (paid at fall registration)

This advanced-level course gives students an analytical perspective on government and politics in the United States. It includes both the study of general concepts used to interpret U.S. politics, as well as analysis of specific examples. Students become familiar with various institutions, groups, beliefs and ideas that constitute U.S. politics. They also become acquainted with a variety of theoretical perspectives and explanations for various behaviors and outcomes, including constitutional underpinnings of U.S. government, political beliefs, political parties, interest groups and mass media, institutions of national government, public policy, and civil rights and liberties. This course involves mandatory summer reading and writing assignments that must be completed by the first day of class, and unlike the regular American Government course, spans two semesters. Note: All students enrolled in this course must take the AP American Government exam in the spring.

Advanced Placement Psychology

Advanced Placement Psychology

Grades Course Open To: 11-12

Credit: 1.0 - weighted for AP

Prerequisite: Grade of B or better in any Social Studies courses taken as a freshman and sophomore, and grade of B or better in both English I (all levels) and English II (all levels)

Fees: AP Psychology exam (paid at fall registration)

This advanced-level course introduces students to the methods of studying human behavior and how the mind functions, and unlike the academic course, meets for a full year. Exploring topics more in depth, students learn about the many areas of the field of psychology and various widely practiced perspectives. A number of areas are studied, from behavior and emotion, to adolescence and adulthood, to abnormal behavior and social psychology. The course provides a background study in a number of areas, including learning, motivation, thinking, intelligence and conflict, among others. Students develop the ability to analyze critically, synthesize and evaluate subject matter through discussion, debate, simulations, lectures, role playing, conducting surveys, observational research, reflective analysis, and interviews of personnel in the field of psychology. The course is intended to prepare students for a college-level course in the subject area, and accordingly, students are expected to do a great deal or reading and writing. This course involves mandatory summer reading and writing assignments that must be completed by the first day of class. Note: All students enrolled in this course must take the AP Psychology exam in the spring.

American Problems

American Problems

Grades Course Open To: 12

Credit: 0.5

Prerequisite: None

This course provides students with the opportunity to discuss and debate major social, economic, political, international and ethical problems through the use of a number of techniques, including group discussion, debate, simulations and speeches. An emphasis is placed on logic, propaganda analysis, semantic accuracy, problem solving processes and securing adequate and reliable information through the use of valid research techniques. The course prepares students for active democratic citizenship and helps them effectively trace economic, social, military, global and cultural problems they may confront in their adult lives. Students actively participate in problem solving discussions, extensive research and other activities in order to become well-informed and logical thinkers.

American Government

American Government

Grades Course Open To: 12

Credit: 0.5

Prerequisite: None

This course stresses the processes of the American government and how it relates to the community it serves. Students examine the branches of government, the constitution, the bill of rights, separation of powers, and the fundamental beliefs of a democratic society. Special attention is given to the party system, the conflict over rights and the interpretation of the constitution, among other topics. Areas of study include modern political and economic systems, civil rights, voters and their behavior, electoral process, foreign affairs, national security, the Illinois constitution and local government, among others. Students develop the ability to analyze critically, synthesize and evaluate subject matter through a variety of methods, including discussion, debate, lectures, role playing, observation of local government in action, and essay writing.

Cultural Diversity

Cultural Diversity
 

Grades Course Open To: 10-11-12

Credit: 0.5

Prerequisite: None

This course analyzes the basic concepts of prejudice, intolerance and discrimination. Students identify various cultures in the United States and discuss both the diversity and intolerance that exists among them. Major areas of study include racism and ethnic intolerance, religious intolerance, and gender, class and other areas of prejudice and discrimination. Students complete several biographies, a research project and film analysis, and participate in various class activities that explore the concepts of cultural diversity and tolerance. Students complete a series of projects throughout the semester that analyze the diversity within our culture.

Human Rights & World Affairs

Human Rights & World Affairs

Grades Course Open To: 10-11-12

Credit: 0.5

Prerequisite: Grade of A in semester 1 of Cultural Geography (applies to sophomores only)

This course helps students identify basic human rights as outlined by the United Nations, and analyzes the roles of the United Nations and the United States in promoting and protecting basic human rights. The course focuses on a number of violations of human rights, including the Armenian Genocide, the Ukranian Famine-Genocide, and more recent atrocities in Cambodia, Bosnia, Rwanda and Sudan. Additionally, students examine the extreme violations of human rights and genocidal policies by the governments of China, Burma, Laos and Indonesia, among others. Students analyze the geopolitical difficulties involved in preventing genocide and protecting human rights, and learn to identify the root causes of genocide. The course also examines the creation of the United Nations Declaration of Human Rights, the United Nations Charter on Genocide, genocide prevention, and the geopolitical issue of human rights and foreign policy. The course examines the policies of the United States in relation to these events, and the abilities of nations to prevent human rights violations and genocide.

Psychology

Psychology

Grades Course Open To: 11-12

Credit: 0.5

Prerequisite: None

This course introduces students to the methods of studying human behavior and how the mind functions. Students learn about the many areas of the field of psychology and various widely practiced perspectives. A number of areas are studied, from behavior and emotion, to adolescence and adulthood, to abnormal behavior and social psychology. The course provides a background study in a number of areas, including learning, motivation, thinking, intelligence and conflict, among others. Students develop the ability to analyze critically, synthesize and evaluate subject matter through discussion, debate, simulations, lectures, role playing, conducting surveys, observational research, completing research papers, and through interviews of personnel in the field of psychology.

Sociology

Sociology

Grades Course Open To: 11-12

Credit: 0.5

Prerequisite: None

This course helps students examine humankind in social groups and as individuals, and affords them the opportunity to learn about themselves and others in group behavior. The subjects of various cultures and current social issues such as crime, minorities and war provide for stimulating discussion and projects. Students develop the ability to analyze critically, synthesize and evaluate subject matter through discussion, debate, simulations, lectures, role playing, conducting surveys, observational research, reflective analysis, and interviews of personnel in the field of sociology. A number of subject areas are addressed, from sociological theories and social research, structure and interaction, to race, ethnic groups and social movements and change, among others.

World History

World History

Grades Course Open To: 10-11-12

Credit: 1.0

Prerequisite: None

This course provides students perspective of past events and their relationship to the modern world. Students learn how past events have contributed to the shape of modern culture and civilization, and study the geographic regions of ancient civilizations in comparison with today’s world. Through the study of ancient civilizations, including Greece and Rome, students learn the major ways in which such past civilizations have affected modern civilization. Other areas of study include the Medieval Period, the Reformation, the Renaissance and the Modern Age, as well as other significant periods and events. Students use multiple resources to participate in both group and individual research projects.

Accounting I

Accounting I

Grades Course Open To: 10-11-12

Credit: 1.0

Regional ID: B2001

Prerequisite: None

This course provides students with general vocational preparation for the business world, and also meets the needs of students who wish to obtain a position in some phase of accounting. It is designed for students who plan to pursue secretarial, small business and college careers. The concepts of double entry bookkeeping and income tax are introduced. Students systematically complete the accounting cycle of journalizing transactions, posting transactions, preparing a worksheet, preparing financial statements, closing the ledgers and preparing a post-closing trial balance. Several areas of study, including accounting for both service and merchandise businesses, corporate accounting and automated accounting, among others, are emphasized. Students are expected to learn terminology important in the field, as well as other concepts and standard practices.

Accounting II Honors

Accounting II Honors

Grades Course Open To: 11-12

Credit: 1.0

Regional ID: B2011

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Accounting I

This course is designed for students who plan to pursue business studies in college, or for students who plan to seek employment in the accounting field immediately following graduation. Corporate accounting theory is introduced, and the use of computer software covers cyclical procedures efficiently. Students learn about the duties and educational requirements of entry and advanced level positions in the field, the relationships of assets, liabilities and capital as an extension of the basic accounting equation, and the differences between a sole proprietorship, partnership and corporation. Included among the areas of study are financial statements, partnerships, various clerk positions, departmentalized accounting and forming corporations, among others.

Business & Technology Concepts

Business & Technology Concepts

Grades Course Open To: 9

Credit: 0.5

Regional ID: B110.5

Prerequisite: None

This course is designed to develop basic business document and presentation formatting skills using various Microsoft Office programs (Word, Excel, PowerPoint). Students use the Skills Assessment Manager program (SAM2010) to practice and apply important Microsoft Office skills. Students also learn proper touch keyboarding techniques and understand the importance of efficient keyboarding skills in today’s business world. Internet safety concepts - ranging from cyber bullying and cyber predators to identity theft and safe navigation of social networking sites - are discussed through the i-SAFE Education Program. Students must complete this course to graduate.

Business Economics

Business Economics

Grades Course Open To: 10-11-12

Credit: 0.5

Prerequisite: None

This course is an intense approach on economic living in a global society, and explains the vital role economics plays in improving the quality of students’ decision making process. Stressing the point that trade and exchange reach every aspect of their lives through the choices they make in the marketplace, students learn that international relations revolve as much around economic matters as political affairs. This class covers a number of areas, ranging from market system concepts and supply and demand, to investments and the stock market, to inflation, taxes and the Federal Reserve System, among others. Note: This course satisfies the Consumer Education requirement for graduation.

Business Law

Business Law

Grades Course Open To: 10-11-12

Credit: 0.5

Prerequisite: None

This course addresses many legal situations that individuals and families face every day, helps students develop attitudes on law and society, and focuses on the importance and obligations of citizenship. An emphasis is placed on contracts, such as insurance, buying and selling of real estate, obligations between employers and employees, debtor and creditor relations, and the renting and borrowing of goods. The legal aspects of drafts, checks, and notes are also covered. Students learn about minors’ rights and some adult duties, the broad application of Police Power, classification of crimes, and torts. A number of areas of law are covered, specifically in relation to society, citizens, minors, consumers and the business community. Other topics include crimes, voidable agreements, breach, personal property and bailments, among others.

Introduction to Business

Introduction to Business

Grades Course Open To: 9-10-11-12

Credit: 0.5

Regional ID: B2101

Prerequisite: None

This course introduces students to business and economic concepts that will help them understand their role in today’s market. Students learn about government’s role in business, and the importance of ethics and social responsibility as a business leader. Marketing and advertising concepts are introduced, with students creating their own commercials. Students also learn the importance of managing their credit and personal finances.

Computer Applications

Computer Applications

Grades Course Open To: 9-10-11-12

Credit: 0.5

Regional ID: B120.5

Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in Business & Technology Concepts

With an emphasis on hands-on, independent learning, this course is highly recommended for all college-bound students and those who plan to enter today’s competitive job market. The course builds upon knowledge and skills learned in Business & Technology Concepts, covering advanced business applications in word processing, spreadsheet, presentation and desktop publishing software (Microsoft Office 2010 and Movie Maker). Students become familiar with proper communication skills and professional behavior expected of them on the job. They also are introduced to business, financial and mathematical functions used to create professional business documents.

Desktop Publishing

Desktop Publishing

Grades Course Open To: 9-10-11-12

Credit: 0.5

Regional ID: B267

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Business & Technology Concepts

This course gives students the opportunity to produce a variety of professional, quality business documents that combine text, graphics, illustrations and photographs using Microsoft Publisher. Students at a number of skill levels work to master their desktop publishing skills. Additionally, students learn how to turn school projects and presentations into videos with movie-making software.

Interrelated Occupations/CVE

Interrelated Occupations/Cooperative Vocational Education (CVE)

Grades Course Open To: 11-12

Credit: 2.0 (1.0 Classroom, 1.0 Work)

Regional ID: AL232

Prerequisite: Completed program application, two teacher recommendations, consent of program coordinator - Note: Students must be 16 years of age within 45 days after the first day of school year and provide their own transportation
This two-phase course provides training related to jobs held by the students enrolled. A classroom phase teaches students job skills and helps them develop individualized career planning portfolios. The job phase allows students to practice their skills in an occupational setting, requiring them to work 15 hours weekly. The Cooperative Vocational Education (CVE) program is designed to develop students academically, personally and professionally as they develop critical thinking (SCANS SKILLS), human relation and self-assessment skills through participation in discussions, employer/employee simulations, journals, role playing, rubrics, 5-year plans, a career planning portfolio, classroom presentations and projects, cooperative learning, multiple intelligences/team building activities, personal/class mission statements, and graphic organizers. Guest speakers and a field trip to the Board of Trade/Federal Reserve Bank are also planned. Future planning, entering the workforce, developing essential skills and the stock market are covered. Note: Students are expected to participate in both the classroom and work phases.

Professional Internship Program (PIP)

Professional Internship Program (PIP)

Grades Course Open To: 12

Credit: 0.5 or 1.0

Prerequisite: Cumulative GPA of at least 2.50, completed program application, teacher recommendation and career choice

This course allows students to acquire valuable professional experience and create a network of contacts as they prepare to enter a competitive job market. Students leave the building during scheduled periods and meet with mentors in the workplace. Students must seek out a professional in the community, provide their own transportation, and dress and act appropriately. Students are required to communicate every other week with the program coordinator, and must submit an end-of-semester reflection or a journal/portfolio of work completed.

Web Design & Development I

Web Design & Development I

Grades Course Open To: 9-10-11-12

Credit: 0.5

Regional ID: B238

Prerequisite: None

This course provides students with an introduction to create and design material that can be posted on the World Wide Web. Students begin building basic pages and move on to more advanced Web sites as the course progresses, and also sharpen their creativity through their coursework. A variety of topics are introduced, including HTML code, principles of effective design, legal and ethical issues, and Web design through using a variety of Internet browsers. Students use a number of types of software, including Notepad++, Microsoft Word, Microsoft Excel and Adobe Dreamweaver.

Web Design & Development II

Web Design & Development II

Grades Course Open To: 9-10-11-12

Credit: 0.5 - students may choose Honors option (teacher approval)

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Web Design & Development I

This course is a continuation of Web Design & Development I, and strengthens skills that students learned in that introductory course. An emphasis is placed on multimedia applications and programming tools, such as JavaScript and HTML, and using them to create Web pages and Web sites that combine text, hyperlinks, images, video and sound. Hardware and software are used capture, create, edit and compress audio and video clips and animated text, graphics and images. Students learn to create dynamic Web pages using the latest software, and enter those projects in contests with other local high schools. Some areas of study include HTML, JavaScript, XHTML, and advanced design and coding principles. Some of the software utilized includes Adobe CS 5 (Dreamweaver, Flash and Fireworks), Microsoft Word, Microsoft Excel, Microsoft Expression Web, and Notepad. Students may choose to take this course at the Honors level by choosing and completing more rigorous assignments.

Advanced Baking

Advanced Baking

Grades Course Open To: 11-12

Credit: 0.5

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Food Preparation

This course builds on concepts learned in Food Preparation, with students learning techniques utilized when making specialty baked goods. Included among the areas of study are cake baking and decorating, candy making, cookies cookies, quick breads and yeast breads. Students develop skills for baking in a lab setting.

Child Development

Child Development

Grades Course Open To: 10-11-12

Credit: 0.5

Regional ID: H105

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Parenting preferred

This course prepares students to understand the developing child, allowing them to formulate their own philosophies of what is important to a child as our society continues to change. The areas of health and safety, relationships with children, teaching communication techniques, and child abuse and neglect are all addressed. Students determine realistic expectations of children by becoming aware of how they develop physically, emotionally, socially and cognitively.

Culinary Arts

Culinary Arts

Grades Course Open To: 11-12

Credit: 1.0

Regional ID: H213

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Food Preparation

This course expands on concepts and skills learned in Food Preparation and also introduces new topics. Students develop skills through the study and preparation of food in units such as food safety and sanitation, quick breads, poultry, gingerbread house construction, soups, Chinese cuisine, vegetables, pastries and cake decorating. Careers and employment in food service are explored as well.

Family & Consumer Sciences Survey

Family & Consumer Sciences Survey

Grades Course Open To: 9

Credit: 1.0

Regional ID: H100

Prerequisite: None

This orientation course is designed to make students aware of occupations, skills and areas associated with family and consumer science. Areas such as relationships, family, parenting, child care and development, and nutrition with food preparation are all emphasized. Students obtain skills necessary to prepare quick breads and eggs, as well as simple nutritious meals.

Food Preparation

Food Preparation

Grades Course Open To: 10-11-12

Credit: 1.0

Regional ID: H106

Prerequisite: None

This introductory course provides students with hands-on food preparation experience through lab work, as they develop a variety of skills necessary to function successfully in a kitchen. Students gain knowledge in a number of areas, including kitchen and food safety, measuring techniques, recipe terms and reading a recipe. Students are expected to identify equipment used in food preparation and demonstrate its proper use, and master preparation techniques used to prepare foods from each unit covered, including yeast breads, cakes, meats, fruits, Italian cuisine, salads and cookies.

Interior Design I

Interior Design I

Grades Course Open To: 10-11-12

Credit: 0.5

Prerequisite: None

This course introduces students to the concepts of interior design. The coursework integrates knowledge, skills and practices required for pursuing a career in housing and interior design, utilizing appropriate technology as needed. The impact of color, use of textiles, arrangement of furnishings, addition of accessories and use of lighting are all explored through design projects.

Interior Design II

Interior Design II

Grades Course Open To: 10-11-12

Credit: 0.5

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Interior Design I

This course expands on the concepts that students learned in Interior Design I, providing them with advanced knowledge of skills and practices required for pursuing a career in the field of housing and interior design. The areas of kitchen, bathroom and bedroom design, as well as housing renovation and landscaping, are all explored.

International Cooking

International Cooking

Grades Course Open To: 11-12

Credit: 0.5

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Food Preparation or consent of Division Chair

This course explores the culture and cuisine of many different regions of the world, including Latin America, Europe, the Mediterranean and Asia. In lab groups, students focus their studies on a specific country within a region, including geography, climate, holidays and its cuisine. Topics covered in the area of cuisine are ingredients, cooking methods, meal patterns and regional differences.

Nutrition

Nutrition

Grades Course Open To: 10-11-12

Credit: 0.5

Prerequisite: None

This course is designed to provide students with an understanding of the basic six nutrients - protein, carbohydrates, fat, vitamins, minerals and water. The areas of study include functions of nutrients in the body, daily intake requirements, and the best food sources for nutrients. The course also focuses on how students can use that information when planning meals and making daily personal food choices. Students evaluate their own eating habits, and also prepare simple nutritionally sound meals in the foods lab.

Parenting

Parenting

Grades Course Open To: 10-11-12

Credit: 0.5

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Child Development preferred

This course provides students with a view of the family as a system, and gives them basic knowledge of parenting, nurturing and care-giving in society. The course emphasizes the fact that becoming a parent affects an individual’s personal, educational and career goals. Students are introduced to concepts relating to family planning, labor and delivery, and prenatal development, as well as to nurturing infants, toddlers and preschoolers, and guiding grade school age children and teenagers. Students have the opportunity to care for a Baby-Think-It-Over simulation doll for one weekend.

Drafting/CAD I

Drafting/CAD I

Grades Course Open To: 10-11-12

Credit: 0.5

Regional ID: I114/I283

Prerequisite: None

Fees: Course fee applies (for materials)

This course provides students who plan on pursuing a career in engineering, architecture, interior design, construction, manufacturing or other related fields, with an opportunity to explore the field of drafting. Some of the major units of study include freehand sketching, lettering, multi-view drawing, isometric drawing, geometric construction, dimensioning, sectioning, and an introduction to 3D design using the latest CAD software. The use of CAD software is an integral part of this course.

Advanced CAD II Honors

Advanced CAD II Honors

Grades Course Open To: 11-12

Credit: 1.0 - Honors credit

Regional ID: I270

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Drafting/CAD I or consent of Division Chair

This course is a study of advanced CAD concepts relating to mechanical design and residential architectural design principles and techniques. Some of the major units of study include advanced AutoCAD commands, basic parametric modeling, basic house design, room planning, working drawings, rendering, scene creation and camera animations. Students work up to their major project of designing a home and animating a walk-through. This course is ideal for students who are interested in architecture, engineering, construction, interior design or related fields. The use of CAD software is an integral part of this course.

Advanced CAD III Honors

Advanced CAD III Honors

Grades Course Open To: 12

Credit: 1.0 - Honors credit

Regional ID: I274

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Advanced CAD II Honors or consent of Division Chair

This advanced-level course allows students to further investigate and develop advanced mechanical and/or architectural CAD concepts. Students complete several advanced projects within the area(s) of mechanical design or residential and/or commercial architectural design. Students may be required to produce a scale model of their designs.

Orientation to Industrial Technology

Orientation to Industrial Technology

Grades Course Open To: 9

Credit: 1.0

Regional ID: T100

Prerequisite: None

Fees: Course fee applies (paid at fall registration)

This exploratory course gives students exposure to a variety of industrial-technical occupations, as well as beginning skill development in areas that are important to many industrial jobs. Included among the areas of study are measurement and calibration, identification, use and safety of portable and industrial tools, decision making in the design and processing of a product, and introductory concepts in production technology, transportation technology, communication technology and energy utilization technology. Students learn basic industrial skills and processes for drafting and design, robotic engineering, basic woodshop production, bridge design, construction and testing, carbon dioxide powered dragster design, fabrication, and finishing and testing. Students develop employability and transition skills and vocational ethics as well.

Production Honors

Production Honors

Grades Course Open To: 12

Credit: 1.0 - Honors credit

Regional ID: I259

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Woods Technology I and II or consent of Division Chair

Fees: Course fee applies (paid at fall registration)

This advanced-level course emphasizes production as an occupation, with a concentration on skill development in advanced machining operations and industrial techniques. Students run an entrepreneurial cabinet shop, which includes the design, drawing, construction, finishing and installation of the client’s goods. Recordkeeping of the operation also is part of the course. Some skills that students acquire include performing first piece inspection, verifying dimensions, alignments and clearances, transferring layouts from sample parts of templates, and setting up precision drills. Students develop employability and transition skills and vocational ethics.

Woods Technology I

Woods Technology I

Grades Course Open To: 10-11-12

Credit: 0.5

Regional ID: I105

Prerequisite: None

Fees: Course fee applies (paid at fall registration)

This course begins a study of the properties and fabrication of wood products, as related to construction and finishing of residential housing. A number of areas introduce basic skill development, including identification of proper adhesives and bonding products for interior and exterior use, identification and use of lumber and construction materials, construction mathematics, measurements, accuracy of layout and marking, identification and use of hand tools, identification and use metal fasteners, and the operation of power drills, saws, routers, shapers, joiner, pneumatic nailers and double-hole boring. Laboratory activities allow students to develop introductory skills for the construction industries. Safety awareness and practice are emphasized and are integral parts of each major unit of study. Students develop employability and transition skills and vocational ethics as well.

Woods Technology II

Woods Technology II

Grades Course Open To: 11-12

Credit: 1.0

Regional ID: I258

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Woods Technology I or consent of Division Chair

Fees: Course fee applies (paid at fall registration)

This course begins with a study of the principles and elements of good design for residential construction, trimming and permanent casements. A major emphasis is placed on planning and cost estimation, reading plans, construction and finishing, and efficient time management. The sequence of stages and components for residential construction are also addressed. Some projects may include scale house structures and custom cabinets. Students develop employability and transition skills and vocational ethics as well.

English I Preparatory

English I Preparatory

Grades Course Open To: 9

Credit: 1.0

Prerequisite: Placement based on student’s placement exam results

This course introduces students to college-level application of literary devices and their uses to affect their audience. Communication skills are strengthened through the study of audience appeals used in media, including text, political cartoons, advertising, speeches and op-ed pieces. Special attention is given to argumentative literacy and the development of a mature argumentative writing style. With a focus placed on advancing expression of thought, students are introduced to the rhetorical situation and the language landscape. Elements of grammar and usage are integrated into all composition units, with emphasis given to common errors as revealed in student writing and in standardized tests. Students read from a variety of short stories, poems, novels, drama and non-fiction, ranging from The Odyssey and Romeo and Juliet, to contemporary speeches, articles, visual text and public radio broadcasts. Note: This course is not accepted by the NCAA Eligibility Center.

English I Academic

English I Academic

Grades Course Open To: 9

Credit: 1.0

Prerequisite: Placement based on student’s placement exam results

This course places an emphasis on the interrelationships between literature and composition skills. Both inferential reading and the furthering of interpretive skills are stressed. Students read from a variety of short stories, poems, novels, drama and non-fiction, ranging from The Odyssey and Romeo and Juliet, to contemporary speeches, articles, visual text and public radio broadcasts. Students are introduced to analytical writing, audience appeals and the language landscape; the students’ goal is to acquire the skills necessary to write strong argumentative papers that both include and exclude research. Special attention is given to style and structure in text. Grammar and usage studies address concerns evident in standardized tests and student writing.

English I Honors

English I Honors

Grades Course Open To: 9

Credit: 1.0 - Honors credit

Prerequisite: Placement based on student’s placement exam results

This course is designed for students with highly advanced language and reading skills and begins to introduce the Advanced Placement curriculum. Time is devoted to the reading and interpretation of literature, nonfiction text and visual text. Students learn rhetorical analysis, audience appeal and the Toulmin framework for argumentative writing, with the expectation that these skills are employed in their writing. Socratic methods of discussion are stressed. In their composition studies, students are introduced to argumentation and literary criticism as forms of written discourse. Grammar and writing mechanics are integrated into all composition work, and concerns evident in standardized tests and students’ compositions are given special attention. In addition, students are introduced to the Great Books process, an expectation throughout the four-year Honors and Advanced Placement articulated program. Students must be independent learners with excellent study skills and habits and maintain high academic standards throughout this fast-paced class. Due to the course’s rigor, students must display excellent time management skills in order to meet the demands of the curriculum. Students must attend and actively participate in four Great Books sessions to be retained in the Honors program. The course is especially useful for students who plan to attend major universities or who will be seeking advanced college placement.

English II Preparatory

English II Preparatory

Grades Course Open To: 10

Credit: 1.0

Prerequisite: Successful completion of English I Preparatory or consent of Division Chair

This course continues to develop college-level application of literary devices and their uses to affect audience. Communication skills are extended through the study and application of audience appeals found in written, oral and visual texts. While special attention is given to argumentative literacy, the practice of a mature writing style is emphasized. A survey of world literature includes short stories, poetry, non-fiction and plays, with a goal of increasing the appreciation, comprehension and interpretation of good literature. Note: This course is not accepted by the NCAA Eligibility Center.

English II Academic

English II Academic

Grades Course Open To: 10

Credit: 1.0

Prerequisite: Successful completion of English I Academic or consent of Division Chair

This course continues to prepare students in the study of world literature and composition skills. Growth is expected both in the areas of inferential reading and making critical judgments regarding literature, which can include a major three-act play, short stories, poetry and non-fiction. In composition studies, students expand their knowledge and control of analytical writing, audience appeal, rhetoric and argument. Students also employ these skills as they increase their speaking and listening skills while being introduced to Socratic Seminars.

English II Honors

English II Honors

Grades Course Open To: 10

Credit: 1.0 - Honors credit

Prerequisite: Grade of B or better in English I Honors

This course continues to prepare highly advanced students within the pre-Advanced Placement curriculum. Continued growth is expected in the skill areas of rhetorical analysis, persuasive appeals, composition, argumentation and discussion. Students are introduced to the elements of research. Special attention is given to the inferential reading of fiction, non-fiction and visual text. The continued employment of the Toulmin framework is expected in the development of increasingly sophisticated critical judgments, and literature is explored using the Socratic method of discussion. Grammar and writing mechanics are integrated into all composition work, and concerns evident in standardized tests and students’ compositions are given continued attention. Students must be independent learners with excellent study skills and habits and maintain high academic standards throughout this fast-paced class. Due to the course’s rigor, students must display excellent time management skills in order to meet the demands of the curriculum. Students must  attend and actively participate in four Great Books sessions to be retained in the Honors program. The course is especially useful for students who plan to attend major universities or who will be seeking advanced college placement.

English III Preparatory

English III Preparatory

Grades Course Open To: 11

Credit: 1.0

Prerequisite: Successful completion of English II Preparatory or consent of Division Chair

This course is a continuation of studies in composition and literary skills for students who experience moderate difficulty in writing and reading skills. In composition, a focus is placed on a number of topics, including persuasion and argumentation, literary analysis, and creative writing. Students demonstrating needs in composition skills are given special attention. To prepare for college, students must satisfactorily complete a mandatory MLA-style research paper while utilizing technological tools. Students also are expected to increase the time, energy and effort they put forth toward independent learning. Students review the necessary skills to prepare for the English, reading and writing sections of the ACT. Special attention is given to inferential reading and increasing the appreciation and interpretation of good American literature - from Colonial to contemporary - are focused upon, including pieces of fiction, drama, nonfiction and poetry. Works such as The Crucible, Into the Wild, Of Mice and Men and The Catcher in the Rye are studied, with an emphasis placed on critical reading and interpretation. Note: This course is not accepted by the NCAA Eligibility Center.

Communications

Communications

Grades Course Open To: 10

Credit: 0.5

Prerequisite: None

This course provides students with a variety of speech communication experiences, with an emphasis placed on the preparation, organization, composition and delivery of the oral presentation. Students study interpersonal communication, verbal and non-verbal communication, and listening skills. Students present a number of speeches throughout the course, including an expository presentation, a research-based persuasion speech, and a demonstration performance.

English III Academic

English III Academic

Grades Course Open To: 11

Credit: 1.0

Prerequisite: Successful completion of English II Academic or consent of Division Chair

This course continues studies in composition and literary skills for average to above-average students. A focus is placed on a number of composition topics, including persuasion and argumentation, literary analysis, and creative writing. In accordance with being prepared for college, students must satisfactorily complete a mandatory MLA-style research paper while utilizing technological tools. Students are expected to increase the time, energy and effort they put forth toward independent learning. Students review skills needed in preparation for the English, reading, and writing sections of the ACT. Special attention is given to inferential reading and increasing the appreciation and interpretation of good American literature - from Colonial to contemporary - are focused upon, including pieces of fiction, drama, nonfiction and poetry. Works such as The Crucible, Into the Wild, Of Mice and Men and The Catcher in the Rye are studied, with an emphasis placed on critical reading and interpretation.

English III: AP Language & Composition

English III: Advanced Placement Language & Composition

Grades Course Open To: 11

Credit: 1.0 - weighted for AP

Prerequisite: Grade of B or better in English II Honors

Fees: AP English Language & Composition exam (paid at fall registration)

This course is designed for the most advanced students and furthers the work done in the English I and II Honors courses. Following a curriculum approved by the College Board, the college-level course requires students to examine the rhetorical situation and study a variety of rhetorical contexts in order to become able thinkers, readers and writers. Students identify the tools of successful writers and employ those techniques in their own writing. Writing instruction focuses upon argumentation, with added emphasis on synthesis and rhetorical analysis. Due to the course’s rigor, students must display excellent time management skills learned and practiced in previous Honors courses in order to meet the demands of the curriculum. Students must attend and actively participate in four Great Books sessions to be retained in the Honors program. The course is especially useful for students who plan to attend major universities or who will be seeking advanced college placement. Note: All students enrolled in this course are prepared for and expected to take the AP English Language & Composition exam in the spring.

English IV Preparatory

English IV Preparatory

Grades Course Open To: 12

Credit: 1.0

Prerequisite: Successful completion of English III Preparatory or consent of Division Chair

This course concludes the language skill development program for students with a need for further development in grade level in reading and writing. Composition units integrate grammar and usage with student writing assignments that coexist with the literature, and include work in exposition, description, narration, letter writing, and a mandatory research paper that has an emphasis on MLA structure and citations; close attention is paid to revision and proofreading skills in these assignments. British literature from a number of periods is studied, with an emphasis placed on classical heritage; Anglo-Saxon, Medieval, Renaissance, Restoration and Victorian periods; and the Modern Era. Material from Beowulf, Dante, Shakespeare, Milton, Swift, Shelley, Tennyson and many more is included. Special attention is given to inferential reading and to increasing the enjoyment and interpretation of world literature. Note: This course is not accepted by the NCAA Eligibility Center.

English IV Academic

English IV Academic

Grades Course Open To: 12

Credit: 1.0

Prerequisite: Successful completion of English III Academic or consent of Division Chair

This course concludes the four-year program in academic English skills. Student needs are assessed in early composition work, and a special focus is given to any deficiencies that exist. Focusing on college-level models of exposition, the class addresses exemplification, definition, comparison and classification, as well as division, causal and process analysis. The processes of argumentation and critical literary writing are also included. Students work to develop successful college composition skills, which culminates in a research a paper utilizing appropriate research tools and techniques. English literature from a number of periods, ranging from the Anglo-Saxon period and Middle Ages to the 20th Century, is studied. Material from Chaucer, Mallory, Shakespeare, the King James Bible, Tennyson, Browning and others is included. Literary studies are set in their historical context, with an emphasis on comprehension and critical analysis.

English IV: AP Literature & Composition

English IV: Advanced Placement Literature & Composition

Grades Course Open To: 12

Credit: 1.0 - weighted for AP

Prerequisite: Grade of B or better in English III: Advanced Placement Language & Composition, or consent of Division Chair

Fees: AP English Literature & Composition exam (paid at fall registration)

This course concludes the four-year Honors program and is designed for highly advanced students. Following a curriculum approved by the College Board, the course utilizes high-quality literature to help students develop close, critical reading skills, which lead to in-depth analysis and effective spoken and written delivery of ideas. Students learn to analyze content and express ideas in order to show an understanding of form and language and the effects’ authors’ choices have on meaning. The processes of logic, argumentation and critical literary writing are also included. Students develop a college-level mastery of texts, ideas and composition. Due to the course’s rigor, students must display excellent time management skills learned and practiced in previous Honors courses in order to meet the demands of the curriculum. Students must attend and actively participate in four Great Books sessions to be retained in the Honors program. The course is especially useful for students who plan to attend major universities or who will be seeking advanced college placement. Note: All students enrolled in this course are prepared for and expected to take the AP English Literature & Composition exam in the spring.

Advanced Speech Communication

Advanced Speech Communication

Grades Course Open To: 11-12

Credit: 0.5

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Communications

This course builds on and further develops speaking skills taught in Communications, and requires students to make a number of formal presentations. Students select individualized goals for improving their own communication weaknesses, and also present competitive forensics speeches. Rhetoric, debate and small-group communication are also covered. The course is appropriate for college-bound students. Note: This course may not accepted by the NCAA Eligibility Center.

Cinema Studies I

Cinema Studies I

Grades Course Open To: 9-10-11-12

Credit: 0.5

Prerequisite: None

This course introduces students to film terminology and cinematic effects. The study of the history of film shows the progression from silent film to “talkies,” from black and white to color, and from film composition and props to computer generation. Students analyze a variety of genres, including westerns, combat, film noir, musicals, horror, animation and comedy. Students share findings in oral presentations and produce written reflections, with some of the presentations bring group oriented and others being completed individually. Students develop a shot-by-shot analysis and put together a final film proposal. Note: This course is not accepted by the NCAA Eligibility Center.

Cinema Studies II

Cinema Studies II

Grades Course Open To: 9-10-11-12

Credit: 0.5

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Cinema Studies I

A continuation of Cinema Studies I, this course further defines specific characteristics that distinguish film from other media and art forms. Cineliteracy is further documented, and students have the opportunity to analyze additional cinematic selections from a number of genres, such as combat films, comedies and foreign films. Oral presentations, written reports, shot-by-shot analyses and film proposals are again included in the curriculum. Students follow recent developments in the cinema field, creating reflective responses through a “cinema log.” Note: This course is not accepted by the NCAA Eligibility Center.

Creative Writing I

Creative Writing I

Grades Course Open To: 9-10-11-12

Credit: 0.5

Prerequisite: None

In this course, students write their own short stories and poetry and discuss their works in workshop fashion. Peer editing and student-teacher conferencing are key components of the class. A portion of the course is used for lessons in composition, the study and discussion of poetry and short story models, and student writing workshops. The class provides enjoyment for students who like to write for others, and assists all students in sharpening their writing skills. The course is appropriate for college-bound students.

Creative Writing II

Creative Writing II

Grades Course Open To: 9-10-11-12

Credit: 0.5

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Creative Writing I

This course revisits and refines the knowledge and skills learned in Creative Writing I, and introduces more sophisticated literary devices and forms. Students compose works of short fiction, non-fiction, poetry and drama. In an effort to bring students’ writing to a more professional level, published works are read, analyzed and discussed. Classes are conducted in a workshop fashion, emphasizing sharing and discussion. Students are expected to offer and accept constructive criticism of each other's work maturely and respectfully. This class is for students who enjoy writing and seek to have their work published. The course is appropriate for college-bound students.

Critical Reading I

Critical Reading I

Grades Course Open To: 9-10-11-12

Credit: 1.0

Prerequisite: Placement based on student’s placement exam results

This course assists students in improving all aspects of their reading performance. In addition to raising a student’s reading lexile score, the course focuses on vocabulary knowledge, reading fluency, strengthening writing and study skills, and enhancing the enjoyment of reading. Group instruction and small group instruction are used as determined by the student’s needs and interests. Note: This course is not accepted by the NCAA Eligibility Center.

Critical Reading II

Critical Reading II

Grades Course Open To: 9-10-11-12

Credit: 1.0

Prerequisite: Teacher recommendation

This course assists students in improving all aspects of their reading performance. In addition to raising a student’s reading lexile score, the course focuses on the six key strategies for constructing meaning from text – predicting, fiction and non-fiction summarizing, connecting, questioning, inferring and imaging. These key strategies address reading comprehension in all content areas. This course also enhances the enjoyment of reading. A continuum of supportive instruction involving group and individual support is used as determined by the student’s needs and interests. Note: This course is not accepted by the NCAA Eligibility Center.

English Language Learners - Beginning

English Language Learners - Beginning

Grades Course Open To: 9-10-11-12

Credit: 2.0

Prerequisite: Proficiency test and consent of English Language Learners teacher or guidance counselor

This is a basic course designed for new arrivals to the United States who have not previously studied English. It stresses the four primary language competencies of listening, speaking, reading and writing, while emphasizing basic grammar and survival vocabulary. Cultural components of American geography, customs, famous people and historical events are also examined. Note: This course is not accepted by the NCAA Eligibility Center.

English Language Learners - Advanced

English Language Learners - Advanced

Grades Course Open To: 9-10-11-12

Credit: 2.0

Prerequisite: Successful completion of English Language Learners - Beginning, proficiency test and consent of English Language Learners teacher or guidance counselor

This course reviews and expands the grammatical structures and vocabulary learned in of English Language Learners I, and continues to emphasize listening, speaking, reading and writing on an intermediate level.  Students read adaptations of works by Homer, Shakespeare and Dickens, as well as selections from newspapers, magazines and readers. Students write journals, letters, short essays, skits, and also perform basic research. Cultural emphasis is placed on America’s regions, cities, famous citizens and history. Note: This course is not accepted by the NCAA Eligibility Center.

Humanities I

Humanities I

Grades Course Open To: 10-11-12

Credit: 1.0

Prerequisite: None

This course utilizes a dynamic curriculum to encourage students to look at what it means to be human from the perspective of various religions, philosophy, psychology, literature and the arts. Students are encouraged to reflect on and discuss questions regarding freedom, love, knowledge, God, happiness, death, sexuality, nature, good and evil. The class features discussions, readings, writings and reflections - among other activities - on the various fields of humanities. Readings are assorted, varying from ancient philosophical texts to contemporary opinion pieces, and examine core questions from historical and modern perspectives. The course aims to focus on the self, including an exploration of student-produced philosophical questions. The course is appropriate for college-bound students. Note: This course is not accepted by the NCAA Eligibility Center.

Journalism

Journalism

Grades Course Open To: 11-12

Credit: 1.0

Prerequisite: Grade of B or better in English Preparatory II or III or of C or better in English Academic II or III

This course introduces students to the basic principles of journalistic writing and assists them in preparing copy for use in actual newspapers. Specific types of journalistic writing, including feature stories, editorials, columns and sports stories, are covered, as are headline writing, constructing leads, structure of news stories, and page and ad layouts. Students are presented with examples of outstanding journalistic literature, and also begin to learn about newspaper production, public relations, photojournalism and layout software. Students are required to observe the conventions of good usage, and close attention is given to writing clearly and concisely. Students enrolled in this course may assist in the writing, editing and production of the Tom-Tom, the school newspaper, by researching and writing articles, seeking advertising from merchants, preparing advertisements and taking photos, among other duties. The course is appropriate for college-bound students.

Literature of the Supernatural

Literature of the Supernatural

Grades Course Open To: 9-10-11-12

Credit: 0.5

Prerequisite: None

This course concentrates on literature that deals with the unknown in man, the supernatural and death, as well as on literature that addresses knowledge of self, science and family relations. The discovery of understanding is a major focus of the course, and students improve their understanding of the supernatural genre through discussion, research and short creative projects. Works from well-known writers of the supernatural, such as Edgar Allen Poe, Isaac Asimov and Stephen King, among others, are read and discussed. A goal of the course is for students to understand how the genre influences one’s personal philosophy, experiences and religious convictions. The course is appropriate for college-bound students.

Modern Fiction

Modern Fiction

Grades Course Open To: 9-10-11-12

Credit: 0.5

Prerequisite: None

This course helps to increase students’ reading ability in comprehension and analysis, two areas that are utilized in college courses and are tested on the PSAE and ACT exams. Students learn to critically review information by sharpening their skills both by analyzing a novel for literary and social significance, and by determining how literary content transcends time. Students also expand their knowledge in regards to world cultures. Students increase reading ability and awareness of literary devices through methods of marking the text, and apply these comprehension skills to class discussion and written literary analysis. The selected readings are from contemporary authors who are referred to in college-level English, social studies and political science courses. The course is appropriate for college-bound students.

Reading for English Language Learners

Reading for English Language Learners

Grades Course Open To: 9-10-11-12

Credit: 1.0

Prerequisite: Enrollment in the English Language Learners program and difficulty with the English language

This course is intended for students who have difficulty with the English language, and is designed to improve word recognition, reading comprehension, listening comprehension, vocabulary development, reading fluency and critical thinking skills. Group instruction and individualized instruction are used in accordance with students’ needs and interests. Reading strategies are implemented to assist students’ content area reading skills. Students learn to use context clues to define difficult and unknown words; determine the main idea of sentences, paragraphs and short selections; improve reasoning and critical thinking skills; and learn component skills accurately in order to answer questions while reading. Note: This course is not accepted by the NCAA Eligibility Center.

Business Leadership

Business Leadership

Grades Course Open To: 11-12

Credit: 0.5 - students may choose Honors option (teacher approval)

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Introduction to Business, Business Economics, Accounting I, Personal Finance or Business Law

This capstone course helps students learn and develop the vital business “soft skills” and leadership skills for which all employers look. Students learn what it takes to start a business by writing and presenting a full business plan to a panel of judges. Students also participate in a mock interview process where their business knowledge, leadership qualities and communication skills are tested. Students develop their own résumés, cover letters and follow-up letters, and learn about all aspects of the interview process, including how to answer tough interview questions and use social media to get hired. Students may choose to take this course at the Honors level by choosing and completing more rigorous assignments.
Drawing & Painting III

Drawing & Painting III

Grades Course Open To: 11-12

Credit: 1.0

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Drawing & Painting II or Studio Art II, or consent of Division Chair

This course provides advanced students with an opportunity to use knowledge and techniques gained in previous art courses while solving complex drawing and painting problems and developing their personal artistic style. Students plan, conceptualize and create a variety of projects using drawing and painting media. Students are encouraged to explore individual approaches to drawing and painting, and expand their technical skills and creativity.

Humanities II

Humanities II

Grades Course Open To: 10-11-12

Credit: 1.0

Prerequisite: None

A continuation of Humanities I, this course not only continues the discussion of what it means to be human, but also familiarizes students with global and non-mainstream cultures, asking them to explore segments of the population unknown to them with an open mind and from multiple perspectives. The class features discussions, readings, writings and reflections - among other activities - on the various fields of humanities through a global lens. Readings are assorted, varying in era and genre and examining core beliefs and philosophies of an array of cultures. The course is appropriate for college-bound students. Note: This course is not accepted by the NCAA Eligibility Center.

Discrete Mathematics

Discrete Mathematics

Grades Course Open To: 11-12

Credit: 0.5

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Geometry [Class of 2018 – successful completion of Integrated Math III]

This course is designed for college-bound students who do not intend to study Calculus. It is a non-traditional mathematics course whose priority is to connect mathematics with real-life events and situations. Through problem-solving and critical thinking, students explore applications in several professional and career fields. Topics include election theory, fair division algorithms, graph theory, and cryptography. Basic concepts of finite and discrete algebraic structures also are included.

Statistics

Statistics

Grades Course Open To: 11-12

Credit: 0.5

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Geometry [Class of 2018 – successful completion of Integrated Math III]

This course teaches students how to use the four steps of the statistical process – ask questions, collect data, analyze data, and make conclusions – doing so within the context of sports. Major statistical topics include: making appropriate graphical displays for univariate and bivariate data; calculating and interpreting summary statistics for univariate and bivariate data; least squares regression; the concept of independence; probability distributions, including the binomial and normal distributions; and proper methods of data collection, including sampling and experiments. Use of technology, including statistical software, online applets and graphing calculators, is prominent in the course.

Driver Education

Driver Education

Grades Course Open To: 10

Credit: 0.5

Prerequisite: Student must have achieved Sophomore status

Fees: Course fee applies (paid at fall registration)

This course covers the contents of the “Uniform Vehicle Code,” the safe operation of a motor vehicle, a driver’s mental and physical makeup, and general safety, including that of motorcycles and pedestrians. Classroom work includes lectures, discussions, audiovisual aids and various exercises. High school students who complete Driver Education have fewer crashes, personal injuries, traffic violations, drunk driving arrests and license suspensions, as well as less direct economic loss due to crashes. Students who miss more than five classes for any reason fail the course. Completion of the classroom portion of Driver Education from Lemont High School is applied toward the Physical Education requirement. Students must complete Driver Education in order to graduate from Lemont High School.

Units of Instructions
Signs, Signals & Roadway Markings
Driving in Rural Areas
Basic Car Control
Driving on Expressways
Managing Risk with the IPDE Process
Driving in Adverse Conditions
Natural Laws & Car Control
Handling Emergencies
Performing Basic Vehicle Maneuvers
Effects of Driver Condition
Negotiating Intersections
Alcohol, Other Drugs and Driving
Sharing the Road with Others
Insuring a Vehicle
Driving in Urban Traffic
Maintaining Your Vehicle

Introduction to Teaching

Introduction to Teaching

Grades Course Open To: 11-12

Credit: 1.0

Prerequisite: Successful completion of both Parenting and Child Development preferred

Intended to provide a hands-on experience for students interested in teaching or working with children, this course introduces students to a variety of teaching fundamentals. Students learn about grade school development, develop a portfolio, plan and implement lesson plans, and complete research of an education-related career. Students are placed in a preschool or elementary school, where they act as teaching assistants. Through this opportunity, students gain teaching experience, classroom management techniques, and lesson plan ideas. Students must provide their own transportation.

Physical Education Athletics

Physical Education Athletics

Grades Course Open To: 9-10-11-12

Credit: 1.0

Prerequisite: Approval by the course instructor and the student’s coach

Fees: Physical Education uniform (shorts, shirt), heart rate monitor strap, lock - if replacements are needed

This course is designed to give students the physical foundations needed for athletic competition, and - for sophomores, juniors and seniors - substitutes for the regular Physical Education course. It is divided into three phases: pre, in and off-season. The class focuses on increasing strength, improving conditioning, building agility and quickness, boosting lateral and straight line speed, enhancing flexibility, and hand/eye coordination during each phase of a season. This is done through weight lifting, ground based training, plyometrics, foot ladders, dot drills, jumping rope, and core exercises. The development of lean muscle mass helps students avoid injury and heal more quickly if an injury does occur. Dedication to the class enhances students’ success and gives them a competitive edge. Note: This course is intended for members of the basketball programs.

Physical Education Sports

Physical Education Sports

Grades Course Open To: 9-10-11-12

Credit: 1.0

Prerequisite: Approval by the course instructor and the student’s coach

Fees: Physical Education uniform (shorts, shirt), heart rate monitor strap, lock - if replacements are needed

This course is designed to give students the physical foundations needed for athletic competition, and - for sophomores, juniors and seniors - substitutes for the regular Physical Education course. It is divided into three phases: pre, in and off-season. The class focuses on increasing strength, improving conditioning, building agility and quickness, boosting lateral and straight line speed, enhancing flexibility, and hand/eye coordination during each phase of a season. This is done through weight lifting, ground based training, plyometrics, foot ladders, dot drills, jumping rope, and core exercises. The development of lean muscle mass helps students avoid injury and heal more quickly if an injury does occur. Dedication to the class enhances students’ success and gives them a competitive edge. Note: This course is intended for athletes in programs other than football or basketball.

Forensic Science

Forensic Science

Grades Course Open To: 11-12

Credit: 0.5

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Integrated Science or Biology Honors; successful completion of, or concurrent enrollment in, Chemistry Foundations, Chemistry or Chemistry Honors; and successful completion of Physics Foundations, Physics or Physics Honors

This lab-based course allows students to explore a growing field in the scientific community, and incorporates techniques and concepts learned in Biology, Physics and Chemistry. Students are challenged to problem solve with simulated crime scenes and factual case studies. Currently accepted laboratory techniques are taught and built upon throughout the course, giving students progressive insight into the scientific aspects of a crime scene. The topics of ballistics, DNA fingerprinting, crime scene evidence collection, fingerprinting, blood spatter, toxicology, entomology, glass evidence and death all are explored.

Junior/Senior Choir

Junior/Senior Choir

Grades Course Open To: 11-12

Credit: 1.0

Prerequisite: None

This choir is recommended for any junior or senior that has a love for music and wants to sing, regardless of musical background. While basic music and/or choral experience - specifically in the Freshman/Sophomore Choir - is strongly encouraged, it is not required. A voice assignment audition takes place during the first two full weeks of school; no prior musical knowledge is needed. The choir rehearses every other day for one full class period. It performs a number of musical styles, ranging from classical to contemporary and from rock to Broadway, at various concerts, assemblies and contests throughout the year, and may also appear at civic and community functions. Vocal technique, warm-up exercises using the full vocal range, vocal styles and phrasing and vocal patterns are all addressed.

Drawing & Painting IV

Drawing & Painting IV

Grades Course Open To: 11-12

Credit: 1.0

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Drawing & Painting III, or concurrent enrollment in Drawing & Painting III with consent of Division Chair

This course provides advanced art students with intense focus on experimentation, process, thematic focus, and numerous drawing and painting strategies through independent classroom projects. Students continue to explore the nature, scope and principles of drawing and painting. Students are encouraged to explore individual approaches to drawing and painting, expand their technical skills and creativity, consider and experiment with alternative drawing and painting methods, and use the process of drawing and painting as a vehicle of personal expression and creativity.

Beginning Band

Beginning Band

Grades Course Open To: 9-10-11-12

Credit: 0.5

Prerequisite: Less than one year of formal music instruction

Intended for students with no formal musical training, the Beginning Band will provide an environment for students interested in learning how to play a brass, woodwind or percussion instrument. Rehearsing one full class period and open to any student, the Beginning Band may perform at selected concerts or civic events. Students will learn different instrumental and performance techniques, with an emphasis placed upon learning proper warm-up aspects, developing technical skills, and instrumental coordination. Students are introduced to several musical styles, including pop, Broadway, rock, ethnic, and other traditional and contemporary selections. This one-semester course prepares students to participate in the Concert Band, Marching Band and Symphonic Band, and may be taken up to two times.

Personal Finance

Personal Finance

Grades Course Open To: 10-11-12

Credit: 0.5

Prerequisite: None

This course provides students an opportunity to develop life-long learning skills that prepare them for post-secondary education or the working world. Students are introduced to a number of concepts to help develop their financial acumen. Included among the areas of study are finance, personal income taxes, financial planning, banking, investments, risk management (insurance), retirement planning, personal credit, decision making, and consumers’ rights and responsibilities. Students may earn 3.0 dual transferable credits through Joliet Junior College. Note: This course satisfies the Consumer Education requirement for graduation.

Integrated Science

Integrated Science

Grades Course Open To: 9

Credit: 1.0

Prerequisite: Placement based on student’s placement exam results

This lab-based course introduces students to basic scientific concepts, incorporating the areas of chemistry, meteorology, astronomy, environmental science, life science and geology. Students carry out experiments related to the curriculum in an effort to develop their laboratory skills, improve their ability to analyze data, and further their understanding of scientific inquiry, all while applying these skills to real-world examples. Through the integration of the varied areas of science, students draw the connection between physical and life sciences to study the overlying theme of life. The skills learned in Integrated Science are vital for students’ success in upper-level science courses that they will enroll in later in their academic careers.

Digital Photography

Digital Photography

Grades Course Open To: 10-11-12

Credit: 1.0

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Introduction to Studio Art, Introduction to Digital Art, or Introduction to Drawing & Painting

In this course, students emphasize both the creative and technical processes of digital photography using their own digital cameras. Students edit, refine, retouch and manipulate their photographs using Adobe Photoshop and Adobe Bridge. Students are required to have access to a digital camera for assignments.

Graphic Design

Graphic Design

Grades Course Open To: 10-11-12

Credit: 1.0

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Introduction to Studio Art, Introduction to Digital Art, or Introduction to Drawing & Painting

This course offers a foundation in the basic principles of design. Students use problem solving and creative thinking to create print-based media. Students study the communication of ideas and information through the integration of typography, symbols, illustration and imagery. Students utilize Adobe Illustrator, Adobe Photoshop and Adobe InDesign to simulate a contemporary graphic design portfolio.

Theatre Technology IV - Theatre Design

Theatre Technology IV - Theatre Design

Grades Course Open To: 11-12

Credit:
1.0

Prerequisite:
Successful completion of Theatre Technology III, or concurrent enrollment in Theatre Technology III with consent of Division Chair

A continuation of Theatre Technology III, this advanced course focuses on the skills necessary to help design Lemont High School plays, conferences, musicals and concerts. Students focus on lighting, audio and set design, and apply lecture material to projects for the school’s Performing Arts Center and theatre arts program. This course also focuses on computer design skills that are required to design lighting and sets for theatre productions. Students are expected to participate in several mandatory after-school events and clock 40 “hands-on” work hours for those events scheduled in the Performing Arts Center throughout each semester.

Biology: Big History

Biology: Big History

Grades Course Open To: 11-12

Credit: 0.5

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Integrated Science and Physics; or consent of Division Chair

This course presents one large story that helps explain how the world got to be the way it is and where we fit in. It is centered around certain ‘threshold moments’ for our universe, including: its inception, the creation of the stars, the forging of new elements, formation of the solar system and Earth, the appearance of life on Earth and of humans who could learn collectively, agriculture, and the development of the modern world. Note: This course is not accepted by the NCAA Eligibility Center.

Accounting III Honors

Accounting III Honors

Grades Course Open To: 12

Credit: 1.0

Regional ID: B2011

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Accounting II

This is an integrated course in which students utilize both technology and traditional methods of accountancy. The discussion of corporate accounting theory continues, and the use of computer software covers cyclical procedures efficiently. The course covers the same objectives that are addressed in most college entry-level financial and managerial accounting courses. Some of the topics that are covered include valuation, cost accounting, financial statement analysis and cash flow statements. Students utilize a variety of computer software simulations to maximize their practical experience.

Essentials for Integrated Math

Essentials for Integrated Math

Grades Course Open To: 9-10-11-12

Credit: 1.0

Prerequisite: Placement based on student’s placement exam results

This course is designed for students needing additional Mathematical Practices instruction within a rigorous curriculum. Instruction focuses on skills and concepts necessary for students to succeed in Integrated Math I. Students study real numbers; expressions and equations; congruency and similarity of figures; functions and linear relationships; the Pythagorean Theorem; perimeter, area and volume of shapes; and bivariate data. Note: This course is not accepted by the NCAA Eligibility Center.

Integrated Math I Honors

Integrated Math I Honors

Grades Course Open To: 9

Credit: 1.0 - Honors credit

Prerequisite: Placement based on student’s placement exam results

This is the first course of the Integrated Math curriculum. The course is rigorous, as students are expected to learn the concepts, be fluent at processing the skills, and be able to apply concepts to mathematical situations at the appropriate level. Students are expected to use the Mathematical Practices within the course. In all integrated courses, students address the areas of Numbers and Quantities, Functions, Statistics, Geometry and Algebra. Themes of this particular course are centered around linear relationships, exponential relationships, concepts of functions and the interpretation of functions, representing and interpreting statistical data, algebraic connections to coordinate geometry, and geometric proofs through transformations. Additionally, the depth of concepts provides opportunities for students to explore a variety of STEM topics related to the different units. Students in the Integrated Math Honors curriculum also are expected to learn a variety of mathematical topics and integrate those topics while exploring problem sets. Mathematical modeling is significant in this course.

Integrated Math II GB

Integrated Math II GB

(to be added in 2015-16 school year)

Grades Course Open To:
10-11-12

Credit: 2.0

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Integrated Math I or Integrated Math I GB

This is the second course of the Integrated Math curriculum. The course is rigorous, as students are expected to learn the concepts, be fluent at processing the skills, and be able to apply concepts to mathematical situations at the appropriate level. Students are expected to use the Mathematical Practices within the course. In all integrated courses, students address the areas of Numbers and Quantities, Functions, Statistics, Geometry and Algebra. Themes of this particular course are centered around extending the number system, quadratic functions, comparison and transformations of functions, similarities of geometric shapes, right triangles and trigonometry, conditional probability, and circles. The course meets daily, which allows students to develop a proficiency in skills and comprehension of the mathematics language. Note: This course is accepted for one credit by the NCAA Eligibility Center.

Integrated Math II

Integrated Math II

(to be added in 2015-16 school year)

Grades Course Open To:
10-11-12

Credit: 1.0

Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in Integrated Math I or grade of B or better in Integrated Math I GB

This is the second course of the Integrated Math curriculum. The course is rigorous, as students are expected to learn the concepts, be fluent at processing the skills, and be able to apply concepts to mathematical situations at the appropriate level. Students are expected to use the Mathematical Practices within the course. In all integrated courses, students address the areas of Numbers and Quantities, Functions, Statistics, Geometry and Algebra. Themes of this particular course are centered around extending the number system, quadratic functions, comparison and transformations of functions, similarities of geometric shapes, right triangles and trigonometry, conditional probability, and circles.

Integrated Math II Honors

Integrated Math II Honors

(to be added in 2015-16 school year)

Grades Course Open To:
9-10

Credit: 1.0 - Honors credit

Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in Integrated Math I Honors or grade of A in Integrated Math I

This is the second course of the Integrated Math curriculum. The course is rigorous, as students are expected to learn the concepts, be fluent at processing the skills, and be able to apply concepts to mathematical situations at the appropriate level. Students are expected to use the Mathematical Practices within the course. In all integrated courses, students address the areas of Numbers and Quantities, Functions, Statistics, Geometry and Algebra. Themes of this particular course are centered around extending the number system, quadratic functions, comparison and transformations of functions, similarities of geometric shapes, right triangles and trigonometry, conditional probability, and circles. Additionally, the depth of concepts provides opportunities for students to explore a variety of STEM topics related to the different units. Students in the Integrated Math Honors curriculum also are expected to learn a variety of mathematical topics and integrate those topics while exploring problem sets. Mathematical modeling is significant in this course.

Integrated Math III Representations

Integrated Math III Representations

(to be added in 2016-17 school year)

Grades Course Open To:
11-12

Credit: 1.0

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Integrated Math II or Integrated Math II GB

This is the third course of the Integrated Math curriculum. The course is rigorous, as students are expected to learn the concepts, be fluent at processing the skills, and be able to apply concepts to mathematical situations at the appropriate level. Students are expected to use the Mathematical Practices within the course. In all integrated courses, students address the areas of Numbers and Quantities, Functions, Statistics, Geometry and Algebra. Themes of this particular course are centered around statistics, geometric proofs, polynomial and rational representations, logarithmic and exponential representations, and trigonometric representations. This course focuses on the primary standards associated with the concepts.

Integrated Math III

Integrated Math III

(to be added in 2016-17 school year)

Grades Course Open To:
11-12

Credit: 1.0

Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in Integrated Math II or grade of B or better in Integrated Math II GB

This is the third course of the Integrated Math curriculum. The course is rigorous, as students are expected to learn the concepts, be fluent at processing the skills, and be able to apply concepts to mathematical situations at the appropriate level. Students are expected to use the Mathematical Practices within the course. In all integrated courses, students address the areas of Numbers and Quantities, Functions, Statistics, Geometry and Algebra. Themes of this particular course are centered around statistics, geometric proofs, polynomial and rational representations, logarithmic and exponential representations, and trigonometric representations and modeling.

Integrated Math III Honors

Integrated Math III Honors

(to be added in 2016-17 school year)

Grades Course Open To:
10-11

Credit: 1.0 - Honors credit

Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in Integrated Math II Honors

This is the third course of the Integrated Math curriculum. The course is rigorous, as students are expected to learn the concepts, be fluent at processing the skills, and be able to apply concepts to mathematical situations at the appropriate level. Students are expected to use the Mathematical Practices within the course. In all integrated courses, students address the areas of Numbers and Quantities, Functions, Statistics, Geometry and Algebra. Themes of this particular course are centered around statistics, geometric proofs, polynomial and rational representations, logarithmic and exponential representations, and trigonometric representations and modeling. Additionally, the depth of concepts provides opportunities for students to explore a variety of STEM topics related to the different units. Students in the Integrated Math Honors curriculum also are expected to learn a variety of mathematical topics and integrate those topics while exploring problem sets. Mathematical modeling is significant in this course.

STEM Math

STEM Math

(to be added in 2016-17 school year)

Grades Course Open To:
11-12

Credit: 0.5

Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in Integrated Math II, grade of A in Integrated Math II GB, or successful completion of Integrated Math III

This course prepares students for Calculus. The course is rigorous, as students are expected to learn the concepts, be fluent at processing the skills, and be able to apply concepts to mathematical situations at the appropriate level. Students are expected to use the Mathematical Practices within the course. Themes of this particular course are centered around concepts associated with rational expression manipulation, matrices, complex function manipulation, and complex trigonometric functions and formulas.

STEM Math Honors

STEM Math Honors

(to be added in 2016-17 school year)

Grades Course Open To:
10-11

Credit: 0.5 - Honors credit

Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in Integrated Math II Honors and concurrent enrollment in Integrated Math III Honors

This course prepares students for AP Calculus BC. The course is rigorous, as students are expected to learn the concepts, be fluent at processing the skills, and be able to apply concepts to mathematical situations at the appropriate level. Students are expected to use the Mathematical Practices within the course. Themes of this particular course are centered around concepts associated with rational expression manipulation, matrices, complex function manipulation, and complex trigonometric functions and formulas. Additionally, the depth of concepts provides opportunities for students to explore a variety of STEM topics related to the different units. Students in the Integrated Math Honors curriculum also are expected to learn a variety of mathematical topics and integrate those topics while exploring problem sets. Mathematical modeling is significant in this course.

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